(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "...Mirror : Waltham High School"

WALTHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 





3 4867 00650 2258 



Wal. Ref. 

EDUCATION 

1942 



_H 






■ 







% 











I 




}0Ol -o 7 



,S/i 



RECORD OF EVENTS 



IN THE 

WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL 

1941 - 1942 



CLASS OF 1942 




Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster 



WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL 



WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



THE 



MIRROR 



Vol. XXXIII 



Waltham, Mass. 



No. 3 



"-to Ijolo as 'twere, tlie mirror up to natuie. 
Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii 



Editorial Staff 

Edito rs-in - Chief 
Joyce Hitchcock Joan McClutchy 

Assistant Editors 
Lowell Warren 
Shirley Gray 
Business Manager 
William Calkins 
Assistant Business Manager Publicity Manager 

Russell Carlson Melvin Hayden 

Joseph Hill 

Art Editors Music Editor 

Jack Lackenbauer Jeanette Kaufman 

Thornton Regan 

Assistants Sports Editors 

Anthony Vanaria Robert Clark 

John Cobb Doris Besso 

Photographic Editor Humor Editor 

William Bartel Joan Turner 

Alumni Editor Exchange Editor 

Carol Otterson Marie Geisler 

Advertising Staff 

Robert Kelly Priscilla Woodward 

Paul Washburn Aloyse Martin 

Elizabeth Superior Flora D'Angio 

George Kaitz Ruth Omundsen 
Charles Greenway 

Literary Committee 
Robert Erickson, Chairman 
Jane Turner Barbara Stenstrom Toanne Horgan 

Harold Ferguson Veniette Caswell Virginia Winslow 

Robert Bruce Irene Joslyn Esther Gray 

Gladys Nottenburg John Fagan Elaine Douglas 

Jeanne Webster 

Faculty Advisers 

Literary Department Miss Viets 

Business Department Mr. Woodman 

Art Department Miss Burgess 

Arrangement, Make-up, and Press-work by the Pupils of the Waltham Trade School Printing Shop 

under the direction of Mr. J. H. Nottenburg 



Class of 1942 



COMMENCEMENT ISSUE 



Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster 

Foreword 

Waltham High School 

Dedication 

Class Officers 

Class History 

School Activities 

Who's Who 

Class Will 

Class Poem 

Class Prophecy 

Athletics 



Loren Neff 



Francis D. MacDougall 

Doris Ann Besso 

Joseph Francis Hill 



i 



1 , 



Foreword 

ST IS THE SINCERE HOPE OF THE 
STAFF THAT IN THIS YEAR BOOK 
HAS BEEN RECORDED AND PRESERVED 
LIFE AT THE WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH 
SCHOOL AS IT HAS BEEN OBSERVED 
DURING THE PAST YEAR. 




WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 




Dedication 



© 



O THE MEN FROM WALTHAM 
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL WHO ARE 
IN THE ARMED FORCES OF THE UNITED 
STATES OF AMERICA AND WHO ARE 
HELPING TO INSURE THE PERPETUATION 
OF THOSE IDEALS AND FREEDOMS 
WHICH WE CHERISH. 






--Class of 1942™ — ———————— — :• 



SENIORS 




MARIE GEISLER 
Vice-President 




JAMES LaROSEE 
President 




ADELE BETTINSON 
Secretary-Treasurer 



THORNTON REGAN 
Auditor 




Class of 1942—"—— 



Class History 



X 



|sj previous class his- 




%gg tones it may be noted 
that the classes entered as 
wild eyed sophomores, who 
got lost in the labyrinth of 
rooms and corridors, and 
were haughtily looked down 
upon by the upper classmen 
— but not this class. Al- 
though we, as sophomores, 
entered in September 1939, 
our class could disdainfully 
look down upon the college 
preparatory freshmen who 
also as a class entered the 
portals of Waltham High for 
the first time since 1920. It 
can be said that several soph- 
omores did get lost but that was rather of their 
own design. It didn't take us long to discover 
that we could accidentally take the first lunch, be 
excused, and then take the second recess. Any 
sophomore caught going up the wrong stairs or 
cutting through rooms might merely report that 
he was a freshman. And verily I say we were 
not half so "green" as many of the sophomore 
classes before us — at least in our own opinion. 
We soon accustomed ourselves to the routine of 
high school life and quickly learned the traits of 
our upper classmen, whether they were good or 
bad. 

Among our new found responsibilities came the 
momentous question of electing class officers. 
They were: Herbert Nelson, President; Roger 
Johnson, Vice-President; Kenneth Nickerson, 
Secretary-Treasurer; and June Kellogg, Auditor. 
Later we selected our motto "Spectemur Agendo" 
(Let Us Be Known by Our Deeds) and our class 
colors — green and white. 

Football, under the direction of Mr. Leary, 
came upon our horizon, and Waltham, with 
Richard Johnstone and Fred Goguen as co-cap- 




LOREN P. NEFF 

Class Historian 



ta : ns, played in a particularly 
dogged style, refusing to give 
up, and while they did not 
always win, they certainly 
played a clean, well fought 
game. Some sophomore fel- 
lows gained experience as 
substitutes, while others gave 
the team moral support by 
regular attendance at the 
games and by hearty cheer- 
ing. 

Hardly had we recovered 
from Thanksgiving when 
Christmas rushed upon us 
with ensuing practice in bas- 
ketball and hockey. 

In this, our sophomore 
year, we had the opportunity of cheering for a 
hockey team unsurpassed by any other team in 
the history of the Bay State League. The Crim- 
son went through the regular season undefeated 
and untied — a new record. 

Basketball for both boys and girls was an im- 
portant feature of the winter, and the high 
school gym was the scene of many a hard fought 
battle. 

With spring fever, came thoughts of the Soph- 
omore Social. Although it was held on an 
evening of adverse weather conditions, we man- 
aged to have a most enjoyable time, but you all 
know the old, sad story. The girls giggle in one 
corner. The boys shuffle uneasily in the other; 
however, several of the young ladies sang well. 

I doubt that we can boast of one student who 
had not been computing for at least a month, the 
days until June vacation. We received with joy 
our final ranks, and, the year was over. 

That a ten weeks vacation passes into oblivion 
with all too great rapidity was what was on the 
minds of most class members as they climbed the 
steps to resume another one hundred eighty days 



Class of 1942 



of mental regimentation. Naturally we used our 
previous year's experience to avoid work as long 
as possible. The teachers, however, were quickly 
cognizant of our wiles and soon work was swiftly 
underway. Election of class officers was consum- 
mated without difficulty. They were: Roland 
Dion, President; Edwin Thomas, Vice President; 
Jean Butcher, Secretary-Treasurer; and Thornton 
Regan, Auditor. 

Junior fellows were in the line helping the foot- 
ball team make a good uphill fight all the season. 
As reserves, they showed up well. This team I 
record as having had a good offensive and a great 
deal of strength on the ground and in the air. 

We made up quite a number of the hundred 
or so members of the Dramatic Club and several 
were on the executive committee. Meetings were 
held once a month with refreshments served at 
the conclusion of each. Before the Christmas 
holiday the club had a party. Gifts were ex- 
changed and Carols sung. The major activity of 
the club was the presentation of three one-act 
plays which brought forth admiring comment 
from a delighted public. 

A new extra-curricular activity this year was the 
short-order cooking class for boys. In normal 
times one might hear a feminine echo "What! a 
cooking class for boys! Ridiculous!" But with 
war clouds on the horizon and men being drafted 
into the army, a distinct shortage of short-order 
cooks had been suffered. The course, conducted 
by Miss Stewart, was held on Monday afternoons 
for seventeen weeks. The fellows were able to 
learn to prepare many kinds of meats, salads, and 
pastry, and in doing so, they seemed to have an 
excellent time. 

Upon passing the vernal equinox the season of 
light hearts and gaiety was ours. For Mr. Ray- 
mond A. Crawford we had unbounded praise for 
his splendid work in presenting the operetta 
"Naughty Marietta." Our class formed a large 



part of the cast with one or two in character roles. 
Its gay costuming and tuneful melodies were high- 
ly pleasing to capacity audiences on both the 
nights it was presented. 

Having partially recuperated from the ills of 
the season, we waited in pleasant anticipation of 
the Junior Prom. Francis Dougherty was elected 
chairman and soon he and his committee had 
spirited preparations underway. Finally that long 
heralded May evening arrived when we were to 
play host to the seniors who were about to leave 
us. The affair, which was very pretty and very 
successful, forms a pleasant part of our history. 
The boys in their white flannels and blue coats, 
the girls in their beautiful gowns certainly formed 
an attractive group dancing among decorations 
portraying a pent-house roof. Needless to say, the 
gym was amply populated. 

The year was rapidly drawing to a close. We 
felt that much was to be accomplished before that 
final day of reckoning when our reports would be 
given to us. This called for a serious attitude on 
our part, so that we could hardly notice the seniors 
hustling about preparing for graduation. At last 
the final day came. The seniors departed the week 
before and now we were about to leave. When 
we returned in the fall, we would be seniors — 
the highest class in the school. It gave us a feel- 
ing of exaltation. 

On returning in September we were delighted 
to hear the report that the boys were once again 
getting into shape for the coming football season. 
This year it was our turn to have the guiding 
hand in football. 

Again we chose our class officers in the persons 
of Jimmie La Rosee, President; Marie Geisler, 
Vice-President; Adele Bettinson, Secretary-Treas- 
urer, and Thornton Regan, Auditor. 

While the boys were practising football the 
girls were doing their bit at field hockey. The 
different class teams furnished a number of inter- 



—Glass of 1942- 



esting contests. They were always allowed to 
come to our games but, somehow, we were never 
invited to go to theirs. 

After the Thanksgiving recess we looked for- 
ward with a great deal of joy to our Christmas 
vacation, unmindful of the strained relations ex- 
isting between our country and those across the 
waters. 

December 7 marks an epoch in our nation's 
history. At noon that day most of our nation 
were at their radios listening to the President's 
speech. We, too, were fortunate in that several 
students brought radios to school and most of the 
rooms were able to hear that memorable address 
to Congress asking for a declaration of war. The 
international situation began right there to affect 
our student body. Many a boy and girl came 
from a home from which at least one member of 
the family had joined the armed forces. Fred 
Malone, of our class, joined the navy the day after 
Pearl Harbor. Mr. Smith, our ardent teacher of 
the social sciences, went to work in the Douglas 
Aircraft Factory at Long Beach, California. Short- 
ly Mr. Gallagher of the history department en- 
listed in the Coast Guard. Mr. Curran, our 
erudite biologist, began training at the Air Corps 
Technical School, Keesler Field, Mississippi. And 
Mr. Roach, our dramatic artist and literary expert, 
left for Camp Devans. 

After Christmas vacation our sports interests 
turned to basketball and hockey. With only two 
regulars from last year's varsity, our coach, Mr. 
Quinn, had to undertake a great rebuilding job 
in order to get ready for the stiff Suburban League 
campaign; however, the team's showing was a big 
improvement over that of the previous season. 
Regardless of how many games were won or lost 
we may be sure that the boys were in there doing 
all they could. 

At the beginning of the season the hockey out- 
look wasn't too bright, but the team did far bet- 
ter than expected. It lost only two games while 



winning the Bay State League championship and 
received an invitation to the New England high 
school hockey tournament. 

By a class vote in the assembly hall we depart- 
ed from the usual custom of choosing a class 
photographer. It was decided that each should 
have his pictures taken where he chose and as a 
consequence the necessity of appointing a picture 
committee as incurred by previous senior classes 
was dispensed with. Soon we were exchanging 
pictures, however, according to custom which re- 
minded us that graduation would soon be upon us. 

Now it was time to think of the event of the 
year, the Senior Play. Melvin Hayden selected 
"Heroes Just Happen." The cast was chosen, and 
rehearsing began under the direction of our ver- 
satile dramatist, Mr. Roach. Finally that much 
advertised evening in April arrived. The South 
Junior auditorium was filled with people who wit- 
nessed one of the most successful plays that has 
ever been presented by any class. Everyone re- 
marked how unusual it was to have a cast of 
twenty-five in which all did so extremely well and 
too much cannot be said in praise of Mr. Roach's 
untiring efforts. The performance formed an ap- 
propriate prelude to our spring vacation. 

We returned from our vacation with only a very 
few days of school ahead of us. Many things 
kept us busy until the last day. We had college 
boards to pass, incomplete work to make up, and 
obligations to settle. At last with these things 
done we can look upon that eventful day when 
we will cast off into the world to make our mark. 

Graduation day we gather together for the last 
time and look with satisfaction on our days in 
Waltham High School. Our experiences here have 
tempered us to face the future. Now we, the 
class of 1942, are about to go forth into the world 
to execute a debt of gratitude to our teachers by 
showing them that we can bring honor to our 
class by being "Known by Our Deeds." 

Loren P. Neff. 



„_V>X<v9d OX l/''Iiin,«.„«. l i«»"-»-.«»'— »»'.•«— •»«»«-«'i«» l ,»r,;, 



PETER J. ABELLI 

Trade School 
Printing Department 



LIBERA ADELINE ABRUZZI 

Practical Arts Course 

"Lee" is often heard exclaiming 
"Oh, gosh!" To go to modeling 
school and become a model are two 
things she deems important to her 
future. Lee's likes consist of danc- 
ing, collecting foreign coins, roller 
and ice skating. However, she has 
an aversion for gossipers, snooty peo- 
ple and physics homework. Talking 
too much is Lee's worst fault; mak- 
ing friends, her virtue. 



JOSEPHINE P. ALGERI 

Business Machines Course 

"Jo" hopes to become an air host- 
ess before long. Dancing and horse- 
back riding are favorite hobbies which 
may be the reason you often hear 
her wailing "I'm hungry". Honor roll 
2, 3 and the Commercial Club keep 
her busy, as does the 9:20 Club. "Jo" 
has a passion for writing long let- 
ters, and Mr. Hodge's apples. Criti- 
cizing is her bad point but smiling 
is her virtue. And quiet people — 
ugh! 



JACOB JOHN ANTHONY, JR. 

Business Course 

"Jake" said, "That's what I like 
about you ; you're always foolin' " 
when asked about his destination and 
ambition, which are, no less, joining 
the Navy. He modestly relates that 
"I'm a fellow who gets along with 
everybody" (even though his weak 
point is borrowing money). 



JOSEPH AUCOIN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Joe" intends to join the Army — 
as a pilot — when he is eighteen, of 
course. He politely said, "O. K., 
kid" when he was asked to give his 
likes, which are as follows : low 
flying planes and nice girls, "wise 
guys" and "red-heads". His liability 
is being late for class ; his asset, 
being good natured. As for radio 
programs. Red Skelton is tops! 




VINCENT LAWRENCE ABORN 

Business Course 

"Vinny", has a passion for saying 
"That's no lie" and "You're not 
kiddin'." His ambition and destina- 
tion are closely related because the 
former is to go to California ; the 
latter, to travel. Playing football 
and hockey, attending movies, read- 
ing "good" detective stories, and 
those chocolate milk shakes are Vin- 
ny's idea of pleasure. 



CLIFFORD WILLIAM ADAMS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Clif" says "Oh, fiddlesticks" em- 
phatically before stating that his am- 
bition is to become a national hero. 
Is this to eome about by means of 
his destination which is the Marine 
Intelligence Department with Seth 
and Roger? Basketball 1, 2, 3; foot- 
ball and baseball 3 ; and the Senior 
Play occupy Cliff's time. Straight- 
forward people and Bob Hope please 
him, but glamour girls repulse him. 
Borrowing money is an affliction ; 
keeping Johnson out of trouble, his 
virtue. 



GEORGE ERNEST ANDREWS 

Business Course 

"Bud" begins his salutation with 
"How's tricks?" as he states that his 
ambition is C. P. A. and his destina- 
tion, Bentley's School of Accounting. 
Taking pictures is a pass-time, but 
he never neglects the Commercial 
Club. The Kraft Music Hall rates 
high with "Bud" ; and his fault? — 
saying the right thing at the wrong 
time. 



ROSE MARIE ARRIGO 

Business Course 

"Doddy" whispers cautiously, 

"Mary, did you do your homework?" 
Her spare time is given to sewing 
and dancing ; but she has an am- 
bitious future — to be successful and 
visit every state — especially Cali- 
fornia! The Junior Nominating com- 
mittee and Commercial Club have re- 
ceived her attention. She has an 
aversion for oral compositions, but 
has a tender spot for Jean's ice 
cream sodas. She is often late for 
class but she never worries. 



PHILIP JOSEPH BALLO 

Business Course 

Duke's often heard saying, "I ain't 
kidding." He plans to join the navy 
and continue his collection of pins. 
His only dislike is the way love af- 
fairs are carried on in III DAL 






,__o- ,_„_,Xlass of 1942^ 



FRANCIS A. BARNICLE, JR. 

Technical Course 

Fran has set the U. S. Coast Guard 
as his destination after he has had 
one week of solid sleep and plenty of 
fried ice and doughnut holes. Among 
his activities are Junior "Prom" and 
Senior Dance Committees, President 
of IV B Pool Club, student manager 
of the Hop-scotch team and football. 
"Barney" dislikes lending money to 
his hockey-mates. 



HENRIETTE CECILE BEAUDOIN 

Business Course 

"Wait 'till I tell you!" this is the 
"Henny" who hopes to join the Red 
Cross to help win the war. Among 
her activities are the Commercial 
Club, Glee Club, and Mirror Room 
Agent 1941. She likes being silly 
with the "kids" and staying out late 
with ? 1 % Dislikes snobbish people. 



GORDON EARL BENNETT 

Business Machines Course 

Another Glenn Miller fan, "Gordy", 
dislikes Benny Goodman plus mushy 
boys and girls. He plans to beat the 
Axis and then settle down with plenty 
of money and a good wife. Writing 
to brothers in the army is "Beansy's" 
best virtue. Ice Cream, females, 
candy, food and Bob Hope are "Def- 
initely" among his likes. 



ESTHER EVELYN BERMAN 

"Bermie" 

Stenographic Course 

"Got a nickel, Adele" indicates her 
worst fault — borrowing money. Her 
activities include Mirror Room Agent 
1939-'40, Dramatic Club 1-2-3, Com- 
mercial Club Secretary 1941-'42, and 
Honor Roll 1-2-3. She hopes to be 
a private secretary of a large concern 
and then travel around the world. 
Maybe by then she'll stop talking 
out loud in the movies. 



ADELE BETTINSON 

Stenographic Course 

"Any mail for me?" this is none 
other than "Happy" Bettinson. 
Among her dislikes are people that 
are late. Her worst fault is staying 
out too late. To be a good secretary 
is her ambition and she loves her 
summers at York Beach, Maine. Mir- 
ror Room Agent, Class Secretary, 
Treasurer 1941-'42, Secretary of Dra- 
matic Club 1941-'42, Senior Play 
Committee, and Junior Prom Com- 
mittee are just a few of her activities. 




JEAN GERTRUDE BEAIRSTO 

Business Course 

Would like to travel "Deep in the 
Heart of Texas" with her own con- 
vertible and license. She adores tall 
boys with brown hair and collecting 
snapshots of that certain somebody. 
"Ya know what! !" She was on 
the Honor Roll, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Senior Dance Committee, Com- 
mercial Club, and played Basketball, 
Hockey, Baseball and Volley Ball. 
Her worst fault is slowness and she 
detests snobs. 



JOAN E. BENNETT 

Stenographic Course 

Here is another young lady who 
believes in keeping up the morale of 
a certain soldier at Camp Edwards. 
"Blondie" played basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
baseball, 1, 3; hockey, 1; and was 
in the Commercial Club. "No kid- 
ding" but she believes in "Early to 
bed and early to rise." Talking with 
her hands is her special mannerism. 



RITA BENNETT 



DORIS ANN BESSO 

Practical Arts Course 

To live happily ever after is 
"Dot's" ambition after she finishes 
business school. She detests people 
who are never wrong, and oatmeal. 
Some of her activities are Field 
Hockey 1940-'41, Basketball, Volley- 
ball, Baseball 1939-'40, Mirror Room 
Agent 1939-'40, Sports' Editor 1940-'42, 
Dramatic Club 194I-'42 and the Senior 
Play. She likes Red Skelton and 
riding in the country ! Her hobby 
is writing letters. 



JAMES FRANCIS BIGGINS 

Accounting Course 

"Sonny Jim" plans to protect his 
classmates by becoming a marine, 
and when it is all over he'll come 
back to aid the Waltham Fire De- 
partment. He likes the movies, 
plenty of sleep, and "eats." 






VINCENT FRANK BIUNDO 

Business Course 

"Vinny" is counting on joining the 
Braves. "Jeepers" or "Wow" is his 
favorite expression and he likes col- 
lecting stamps. Jim Britt's Sports 
Program naturally is among his likes. 



S. EDSON BLANCHARD 

Technical Course 

Another navy minded fellow is 
"Ed" who plans to become a chem- 
ical engineer after he attends North- 
eastern, President IV B Club 1941- 
'42 and usher at graduation and class- 
day 1940 are among his activities. 
Among his dislikes is the girl who 
wears men's apparel. His best vir- 
tue is promptness. 



MADELINE ESTELLE BLUNT 

Business Course 

She adores good Swedish food and 
the 9 :20 Club. Swimming, skating 
and knitting for the Red Cross are 
her hobbies. She is a member of the 
Commercial Club. Her ambition is to 
suceed in a good business position. 



JOSEPH MICHAEL BONICA 

Accounting Course 

Joe is another patriotic young man 
who plans to join the U. S. Navy. 
"Porkey" is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club. Taking watches apart 
is his hobby. His favorite programs 
are Captain Flagg and Serg. Quirk, 
Henry Aldrich, Eddie Cantor, and 
Mr. District Attorney. 



TERESA C. BORDENCA 

Business Course 

A "Henry Aldrich" fan is "Terry." 
She would like to become a sten- 
ographer. Activities include the Com- 
mercial Club. Drawing is her hobby. 
Being always on time is her best 
virtue. 




ANNA MILDRED BLANCHARD 

Business Course 

To travel around the world with a 
certain person is "Millie's" ambition, 
after she becomes a telephone oper- 
ator. Chewing gum, sport clothes 
saddle shoes, and hot fudge sundaes 
are her favorites. She dislikes giving 
a composition and girls who "put on." 



PAULINE ROBERTA BLAY 

College Course 

Correspondence, reading, music ,and 
sketching are "Polly's" hobbies. Her 
destination is Emerson College. Ac- 
tivities : Troubadours, Operetta cast 
and Dramatic Club. The Cafeteria 
rush and morons are her dislikes. 
Her worst fault is blushing. 



YOLANDE THERESE BOISVERT 

Business Course 

A member of the Commercial Club, 
"Yo" hopes to find a good job as 
a typist and to succeed. Going out 
with a certain person, strawberry sun- 
daes, and the 9:20 Club are among 
her likes. She detests onions, snobs 
and homework. Talking with her 
hands is a very special mannerism. 



ALICE MARIE BORDEN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Blondie" hopes to work for a 
while and then take the step most all 
girls desire to do some day. She 
likes sewing, ice skating, and playing 
the piano. Blushing is her worst 
fault. 



ANN MARIE BOWLER 

College Course 

Another patriotic spirit is shown in 
"Annie", as she hopes to become a 
nurse in the navy. We wonder if 
she'll get enough to eat there! Chew- 
ing gum and dirty lockers are her 
two chief faults. Movie magazines, 
chocolate, swimming, and tennis are 
among her likes. 






...^...—-^.^....a^..^-.. _,._..,_( i3„ss ot T : /42*' i— "™"" ""*"""" "**"^"™" — ,i— "**"^" 



DORIS MARIE BRADLEY 

Accounting Course 

After her office work she hopes to 
retire and see the world in her super 
deluxe club convertible. Activities 
include field hockey, 1-2-3, basketball 
1-2, baseball 1-2, volley ball 1-2, and 
honor roll 3. Hope she doesn't lose 
the acquaintances made by her best 
virtue with her Irish temper! "Brad" 
is often heard saying "Lavatja 
Lagaetza." 



JOSEPH F. BROWN 

Civic Course 

Have you met "Joe" the new 
governor of Massachusetts'? He was 
awarded this honor for his outstand- 
ing work in tthe United States Navy. 
This was based on his training at 
Texas A. and M. and shooting. 
Glenn Miller and the Bruins' Hockey 
Broadcast are his favorite programs. 



ARTHUR FRANCIS BRYANT 

Practical Arts Course 

"Why sure" "Masher" wants to be 
in the Marine Air Corps. Someone 
has to protect our country! Baseball 
seems to be the most important thing 
in his life. He detests wise guys and 
M. G. Why? His worst fault is 
borrowing money. 



DOUGLAS WILLIAM BURGESS 

Business Course 

"Doug" wants to join the business 
world and become a C. P. A. Things 
look hopeful for business if he attains 
his aim! Sports and the 9:20 Club 
are among his chief likes. 



WILLIAM M. CALKINS 

College Course 

"Bill", or "Cactus" as he is some- 
times called, hopes to become a doc- 
tor, but he says his destination is to 
join the R. A. F. with Pea Green. 
His favorite expression is "Hoot Mon 
— it's Free". "Bill" has been busy 
in high school, being Business Mana- 
ger of the Mirror, 1941-'42; Senior 
Play Cast ; Band, 2, 3 ; and Baseball, 
1. He likes Benny Goodman, fried 
chicken, strawberry frappes, and 
blondes. "Bill's" worst fault is get- 
ting sleepy easily. 




EDITH LOUISE BREWSTER 

Business Machines Course 

"O. K. bub!" she wants to join 
the R. A. F. and go to the Alps. 
You all know "Edie" because she 
was on the Junior "Prom" Commit- 
tee, Senior Dance Committee, and 
the Senior Nominating Committee. 
Her heart beats double time for tall 
boys, frappes, and "Inner Sanctum." 
Negligence in homework is her worst 
fault. 



RUTH E. BROWN 

Practical Arts Course 

Ruth would like a suggestion as to 
what to do when she graduates. . . 
Some day she'll own a ranch with 
June. "Brownie's" hobbies are knit- 
ting, swimming, bowling, and corre- 
sponding. Laughing, eating, and the 
9 :20 Club are among her likes. 



LOUISE MILDRED BRYSON 

Special Course 

Usherette at Parent-Teacher's Meet- 
ing and Orchestra are among her ac- 
tivities. "Dimples" pet like is start- 
ing out for baseball games with 
Doris. "Oh, don't be a drone," is 
her most frequent expression. 



JEANNE MARION BUTCHER 

College Course 

"Number, please" — that's the new 
telephone operator. The reason we 
had to wait so long for our number 
was that she was explaining art 
school to a fellow-worker! Activities 
include Sophomore Social Committee 
and Secretary, 1941, also Senior Play. 
Her hobby is ice skating and she hates 
to fall down when there is no one to 
pick her up! Her ambition is to go 
to Massachusetts Art School. 



GERALDINE ELIZABETH 
CALLAHAN 

Business Course 

"Gerry" hopes to learn French per- 
fectly some day. Meanwhile her 
hob'by is skating. She feels time will 
tell, in regard to her destination ; 
maybe she'll be a typist. "Gerry's" 
favorite expression is "You talk too 
much." She likes Red Skelton and 
going in town with Yo and Millie. 
Her worst fault is her stubborness. 
Being a quiet little girl is her best 
virtue. 






ARTHUR EDWARD CARLSON 

Practical Arts Course 

"Swede" says "Hello" or "How 
are you? You said it!" These are 
his favorite expressions. He hopes to 
join the navy or be a machinist or 
both. "Art," as he is sometimes 
called, has collecting stamps, bullets, 
guns, and pennants as his hobbies. 
His activities include Boy Scouts and 
Church work. Walking and "The 
Great Gildersleeve" are liked by 
"Swede." His worst fault is his 
quietness, and his best virtue, his 
honesty. 



MARY ROSE CASELLA 

Business Machines Course 

To travel when the war is over is 
"Shrimp's" ambition. Her hobbies 
are skating, bicycle riding, and danc- 
ing. "Shorty" was on the Honor 
Roll, 3; and belonged to the Com- 
mercial Club, 1941-'42. "Holy Cow" 
is her favorite expression. Another 
nickname is "Peanuts." "Shrimp" 
hopes to get a job. She enjoys sun- 
daes, candy, and movies, but she dis- 
likes seeing girls make up in class. 
Being on time is "Shrimp's" best 
virtue. 



HELEN CAVOOTO 

Practical Arts Course 

To be successful in whatever she 
does is "snooky's" ambition. She would 
like to enter a nurses' training school 
after graduation and become a chil- 
dren's nurse. "Isn't that cute?" is 
"Snooky's" favorite expression. Her 
hobbies are driving, reading, and col- 
lecting postcards and screen stars' 
pictures. She belongs to the sewing 
club. Being on time and not being 
absent are her best virtues. Her im- 
patience is her worst fault. 



HARRY EVERETTE CHARLES, 
JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Ev's ambition is to become an 
aviation or diesel mechanic. After 
graduation he hopes to get a job and 
attend a diesel or aviation school. 
Keeping out of trouble is "Ev's" best 
virtue. He likes the 9:20 Club, Bob 
Hope, driving, and fooling around 
with engines. 



GRACE ELAINE CHENEY 

College Course 

"Chicken's" many activities have in- 
cluded field hockey, 1 ; basketball, 1, 
2, 3; bowling, I, 2, 3; volley ball, 1, 
2, 3; baseball, 1, 2, 3; honor roll, 1, 
2, 3 ; and the Senior Nominating Com- 
mittee. To teach math and then get 
married is her ambition, and Wheaton 
is her destination. "Chicken's" hob- 
bies are collecting souvenirs and 
sports. She likes to receive mail. 
Her best virtue is that she is almosf 
always smiling. "Chicken" hates to 
wait for late people and busses. 
"Hurry up, Forster" is her favorite 
expression. 




RUSSELL G. CARLSON 

Business Course 

"Russ's" ambition is to be a court 
stenographer. His activities have been 
Advertising Staff of the Mirror, 2; 
Assistant Business Manager, 3 ; Pres- 
ident of Commercial Club, 3 ; Junior 
Prom Committee, 2; Honor Roll, 1, 
2, 3; Band, I. His favorite expres- 
sion is "Yeah-h-h." "Ra" likes to 
collect records. His destination is to 
work at K. L. Co. and go to B. U. 
nights. "Russ" likes girls with 
blonde hair by the name of Ruth 
and dislikes girls wearing slacks. He 
also likes Glenn Miller's Moonlight 
Serenade. 



ANTHONY S. CASTELLANO 

Business Course 

"Tony" often says, "What's that, 
Beans?" His destination is to gain 
a position in a well-established firm, 
and his ambition is to be general 
manager of a large concern. "Tony" 
likes sports and collecting things that 
pertain to sports. He played football 
in '41 and was baseball manager '41- 
'42. Red Skelton is his favorite pro- 
gram. "Tony" likes sociable people. 



ANDREW CAY 

Practical Arts Course 

Andy, who, by some obscure reas- 
oning, has won the nickname of 
"George," plans to visit the Far East 
via New York. His chief ambition 
is to attain the "Relative Security" 
Miss McCullough talks about. Ac- 
tivities include Dance Committee, 1, 
2, 3 and Golf 2. 



WARREN LINCOLN CHASE 

Business Course 

To direct a band is "Chase's" am- 
bition. His destination is to see the 
United States. "Chase's" activities 
have included Senior Band, 1939-42; 
High School Orchestra, 1940-'42 ; 
Sophomore Nominating Committee, 
1939-'40; and High School News Col- 
umist, 1941-'42. "Gosh" and "Jim- 
iny" are his favorite expressions, and 
photography leads the field as his 
hobby. "Chase" likes good music, 
but he doesn't like to see it spoiled. 
Being slow is his worst fault. His 
best virtue is being friendly. 



BARBARA MARIE CHIASSON 

Business Course 

"Bubbles" hopes to become a secre- 
tary and find a position in an office. 
She belongs to the Commercial Club 
and is on the Social Committee. 
Dancing is her hobby. "Bubbles' " 
favorite expression is "Not really? 
Gee!" Her worst fault is blushing, 
and her patience is her best virtue. 
She prefers very tall blondes with 
blue eyes. The 9:20 Club is a favor- 
ite program. "Bubbles' " special dis- 
like is being kept waiting. 



™_, _ M _,<-»__,_._Q ass f 1942 



TILLIE MAY CHIASSON 

Special Course 

"Pip's" hobbies are collecting pho- 
tographs and seeing dance bands in 
person. "No kiddin' " is her favorite 
expression. "Pip" wants to go in 
training at the Waltham Training 
School for Nursing and be an attend- 
ant nurse. She is a member of the 
Glee Club and has been active in 
sports. Being called Matilda is her 
pet peeve. "Pip" is a Glenn Miller 
fan and likes Lux Radio Theatre and 
the 9:20 Club. 



ANTHONY HENRY CINCOTTA 

Business Course 

"Tony's" destination is to travel 
the world and become a sailor. His 
ambition is to be a "boss" or "man- 
ager." "Don't get excited" is his 
favorite expression. Going out every 
night is "Tony's" hobby. Bob Hope 
is his favorite program. 



CHARLES CONRAD CLARK, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Charlie," "Chuck," and "Augus- 
tus" are his various nicknames. 
"Charlie's" ambition is to be presi- 
dent. To join the Foreign Legion is 
his destination. "Yeh, you would" is 
"Charlie's" favorite expression. His 
activities are basketball, I, 2, 3 and 
football, 3. Sports and food are his 
pet likes, but his pet dislikes are 
jive kids or hepcats. He likes Red 
Skelton. Borrowing pencils is his 
worst fault. His special mannerism 
is always walking under ladders. 



ROBERT CLARK 

College Course 

To own a yacht and become chief 
snow-shoveler in the tropics are 
"Bob's" ambitions. His hobby is 
following all sports. "Bob's" destina- 
tion is ground mechanic for U. S. 
Army bombers. He has been Sports 
Editor of the Mirror, played baseball 
for two years and has been on the 
honor roll for two years. "Bob" dis- 
likes swing tunes, neckties, and 
whiffles. He likes Bob Hope. Be- 
ing on time is his best virtue. 



SALVATORE RICHARD 
COLLURA 

Practical Arts Course 

"Midge" has been football mana- 
ger, 1939-'40, I940-'41, and has played 
baseball, 1941-'42. His ambition is 
to be either a newspaper reporter or 
sports writer. "Cheese and crackers" 
is his favorite expression. "Midge's" 
hobbies are reading sporting news and 
trying to get outside stations on the 
radio. Texas University is his des- 
tination. He dislikes grls who wear 
slacks to school. His favorite pro- 
gram is Bob Hope. Getting home- 
work in on time is "Midge's" best 
virtue. 




ROBERT MANNING CHRISTIE 

Business Course 

Collecting session cards is "Babe's" 
hobby. His activities were hockey, 
'38 and football, '41. Bob Hope is 
his favorite radio program. Doing 
his advertising homework is his best 
virtue. "Babe" dislikes getting up 
before 12 o'clock. 



JOHN JOSEPH CLANCY . 

Civic Course 

"Clink" hopes to see the world 
some day. His ambition is to eat a 
chocolate cake and drink a quart of 
milk. Eating and going to parties 
are his hobbies. "Clink" played 
football, 1, 2; hockey, 1; and base- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; His favorite expres- 
sions are "Age before beauty" and 
"That's no lie!" Being easy to get 
along with is his best virtue. Glenn 
Miller and the 9:20 Club are 
"Clink's" favorite radio programs. 



NATALIE CLARKE 

Stenographic Course 

"Nat's" ambition is to be a good 
private secretary but right now she 
spends time playing tennis. She en- 
joys listening to the 9:20 Club and 
drinking raspberry cokes. Her activ- 
ities include the Commercial Club. 



ROBERT EMMETT COLEMAN 

Business Course 

"Bob" wants to go to Harvard 
Business School and become a busi- 
ness machine operator. His hobbies 
are fishing, stamps, and coins. He 
belongs to the Commercial Club, 
1941-'42. "Maybe" and "marvelous" 
are "Bob's" favorite expressions. He 
likes Bob Hope and ice cream. Doing 
everything he shouldn't is his worst 
fault. He dislikes report cards and 
exams. 



HELEN PATRICIA CONNORS 

College Course 

Helen's favorite expression is "Get 
my lunch, Marilyn." Collecting rec- 
ords is her hobby. Her destination is 
college. Helen's activities have in- 
cluded the Dramatic Club, bowling, 
archery, and the honor roll. She dis- 
likes swinging doors in the corridors 
and radio sketches. Mr. Hodge's ap- 
ples and Giardina's after school are 
Helen's pet likes. Her faults are be- 
ing too quiet at times and not hang- 
ing up her clothes. 



-Class of 1942= 



MILDRED LOUISE CONNORS 

Business Course 

"Milly" wants to be just like her 
mother. Her destination is Chicago 
"with Helen". She was on the Sopho- 
more Nominating Committee, a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club, and a 
Mirror room agent. Her hobbies are 
horseback riding, bowling, dancing, 
and midget auto races. "Milly's" fa- 
vorite expressions are "I'm not happy" 
and "I should live so long." She 
likes optimistic people, horses, and 
comedians. Her best virtue is her 
frankness. 



EMILY MARY COTTON 

Business Course 

"Shortie" often says "Oh! Gosh." 
She would like to be a hairdresser 
and also to travel around the world 
with Hen. Skating and dancing are 
her hobbies. "Shortie" belongs to 
the Commercial Club. She dislikes 
giving a composition. Talking is her 
worst fault. She enjoys the 9:20 
Club. 



BARBARA ELIZABETH COYLE 

Business Course 

"Oh! Darn the luck" is "Babs'" 
favorite expression. Her ambition is 
to succeed in whatever she under- 
takes. To find a position that she is 
suited for and that she will like is 
"Babs' " destination. Her hobbies 
are skating and dancing. She be- 
longed to the Commercial Club and 
the Glee Club, 1940-'41 and was in 
the operetta, 1941. Bab likes 9:20 
Club, hot fudge sundaes, and a cer- 
tain 1941 graduate. 



EDWARD ROBERT CRONIN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Darby's" ambition is to join the 
U. S. Flying Cadets. His destina- 
tion is to learn a trade and find a 
good job. "Okay" is his favorite ex- 
pression. His hobby is collecting 
book matches from hotels and restau- 
rants. "Darby" likes chemistry lab 
work and working behind a soda 
fountain. He dislikes people who are 
never in a good mood. He very rare- 
ly gets mad and gets along with al- 
most everybody. 



VIRGINIA RICHINGS CULLEN 

Business Course 

"Ginny" played field hockey, 1, 2, 
3; basketball, 1, 2, 3; bowling, 1, 2, 
3; volley ball, 1, 2, 3; baseball, 1, 
2, 3; and archery, 1, 2, 3. She was 
a member of the Commercial Club, 3 
and was on the honor roll, 1, 2, 3. 
"Darn it!" and "Oh, Christmas 
sakes ! " are "Ginny's" favorite ex- 
pressions. She wants to be a private 
secretary and get a position in a 
business office. Tap dancing is her 
hobby. "Ginny's" best virtue is her 
patience. She likes all kinds of 
sports. 




WILLIAM M. COSGROVE 

Business Course 

"Cos" wants to make some of the 
money going around now. His hobby 
is keeping Quinn under hand. "Stick 
around" and "What's your hurry?" 
are his favorite expressions. He dis- 
likes quiz programs. He likes to 
read aviation stories and listen to 
"The Thin Man." 



JOHN TERRENCE COUGHLAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Terry" wants to join the service 
or go to a prep school, Mt. Hermon. 
His hobbies are roller-skating and 
listening to orchestras. Kay Kyser 
and the 9 :20 Club are his favorite 
programs. He likes banana royals. 
His love for little children is "Ter- 
ry's" best virtue. 



DONALD ALLEN CRANE 

Business Course 

"Don" wants to join the Marine 
Corps. He likes to talk with sailors 
and marines and find what they say 
about the life. "Straighten up, Mc- 
Gee' is "Don's" favorite expression. 



PHYLLIS ANNE CRONIN 

College Course 

"Phyl" wants to go to college, have 
a career, and travel. Her many ac- 
tivities have included the Literary 
Staff of the Mirror, 1941 ; field hock- 
ey, 1, 2, 3; basketball, 1; volleyball, 

1, 2, 3; baseball, 1, 2, 3; archery, 1, 

2, 3; honor roll, 1, 2, 3; senior play, 
and the operetta, 2. "Phyl's" ambi- 
tion is to have a good time and do 
something she likes to do. Her hob- 
bies are collecting sports write-ups 
and dreaming. Her promptness is 
"Phyl's" best virtue. She likes cokes. 



CLAIRE MADELINE CUNNIFFE 

Practical Arts Course 

Bowling is "Clay's" hobby. Her 
ambition is to be a hairdresser and 
attend Banford Academy. "What a 
life!" is "Clay's" favorite expression. 
Sophomore Nominating Committee, 
1940 and bowling, 2 were her activi- 
ties. She likes dancing, bowling, and 
swimming. "Clay" dislikes conceited 
people and catty girls. 



^•I^VOMMI-M-Ii^frn^^! >4a»<>-*»< ><«■»-• "*■•-< I4»i)-4M-I)'^il«» l i-W V > X iX ^ C? V-/ X X J/ X J—- »H«»li«»n«.| l <»! l «»n 4 »o4»i)WU«»liW'il«»om-<i«» l t|l 



JOSEPHINE HELENA 
CUNNIFFE 

Business Machines Course 

"Jo's" ambition is to learn to fly. 
Doing civilian defense work is her 
hobby. Her destination is to get a 
defense job. "Are you kidding?" is 
her sunny disposition. Homework 
been a member of the Commercial 
Club. Red Skelton is her favorite 
radio program. Her best virtue is 
"Jo's" sunny disposition. Homework 
and conceited people are her dislikes. 



MARY FRANCES CUSHING 

Business Course 

"Blondie" hopes to be successful in 
whatever she does. Her destination 
is to travel around the world. Col- 
lecting pictures of certain people is 
"Blondie's" hobby. She is a Com- 
mercial Club member. Being held in 
suspense and going to the dentist are 
her pet dislikes. She likes the 9 :20 
Club. 



EDNA ANNE DAGGLE 

Business Machines Course 

"You ain't lyin' " is what you of- 
ten hear "Ed" saying. Her ambition 
is to become a good secretary. She 
dislikes housework and waiting, while 
her likes are 9:20 Club and cokes. 
Losing her temper and saying the 
wrong thing are "Ed's" faults. She 
is a member of the Commercial Club. 
Twisting her hair when in deep 
thought is a mannerism. She hopes 
to go to work after school. 



SYLVIA JUNE DALEY 

Accounting Course 

To Join the Navy is "Syl's" am- 
bition, although her hobby is danc- 
ing. She is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club. Long finger nails are 
her pet likes. She dislikes Gene 
Autry and people who are not 
punctual. Borrowing Mamie's clothes 
is her worst fault. "Don't argue with 
me," is her favorite expression. 



JEAN MARY DAVINI 

College Course 

Don't crack your knuckles whil' 
"Red" is around because she doesn't 
like it, although she does like to 
visit Concord, and ride with "R." 
"Georgia" is very trustworthy. To 
have all the fun in life is her am- 
bition. Her hobby is collecting phon- 
ograph records. She hopes to attend 
a business school after high school 
and often says "You dopey dill dog." 




ANNE MARIE CUSACK 

College Course 

To have a good time in life is 
"Sugar's" ambition. She is planning 
to go to Business School. "Sugar" 
likes hearing the 9 :20 Club and eat- 
ing. She belonged to the Dramatic 
Club, 1941-'42; played basketball, 
1939-'40; and was in the Senior Play. 
Glenn Miller is her favorite orches- 
tra. Her best virtue is taking things 
as they come. 



ISADORE CUTLER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Eddy" has as his ambition the 
desire to be a successful business 
man, especially in the field of sell- 
ing. He likes especially sports. Jack 
Benny, and driving an automobile. 



PHYLLIS B. DAHLIN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Phyl" likes to be called "Phyl" 
and also Lux Radio Theatre. To be 
a good stenographer is her ambition 
and her destination is to attend 
business school. "Oh, gosh" and 
"gee" are her favorite expressions, 
while watching Dickie is her hobby. 
Talking too much is her worst fault. 
"Phyl" dislikes snobbish people and 
her best virtue is honesty. She was 
a member of the Dramatic Club. 



JULIO H. De AMICIS 

Civic Course 

"Red's" destination is the Naval 
Reserve and his hobby is a girl — 
not girls. He likes Glenn Miller and 
he hopes to do what his two pals 
tell him to. (Joe and Rollie are his 
overseers). "Hey, Joe" and "Hi 
Roland" and "Lo Puppy" are the 
expressions he uses most frequently. 
His activities include: football, 1, 2, 
3 ; Baseball, 1 ; Underground Club. 



ROBERT COMLEY DEACON 

Practical Arts Course 

To become an apprentice of the 
Lynn General Electric Company is 
"Bob's" destination. His ambition is 
to own a sporting goods store. 
"Deac's" hobbies are hunting, fish- 
ing, and tying fishing flies. "Bob" 
likes Bob Hope, but dislikes making 
up excuses for Paul G. "Bob" also 
likes hunting dogs and he would like 
to see the Red Sox grab the pennant. 
"Nuts," "get outa here" are favorite 
expressions. He has been on th exec- 
utive staff of Dramatic Club and has 
been in the band. Spending money 
is his worst fault. 



Class of 1942 



ROSINA K. De RAMIO 

Business Course 

"Rosie's" ambition is to become an 
artist or a writer. This ties up with 
her hobby, drawing. "Rosie" likes 
Truth or Consequences and the mov- 
ies and opera. She dislikes rabbits 
and Errol Flynn. Destination is to 
obtain a good position or become an 
air hostess. Her worst fault is being 
self-conscious and her best virtue is 
being kind to children. "Hello Bright 
Eyes" is her favorite expression. Ac- 
tivities include : field hockey, basket- 
ball, bowling, volley ball, baseball 
and archery, 1, 2. Member of Com- 
mercial Club. 



DORA M. DELLEPIGNE 

Stenographic Course 

"Doe's" hobby is making fudge and 
her ambition is to travel. "Doe" 
likes Glenn Miller's music and jokes, 
also likes Bob Hope and Red Skel- 
ton. Impatience is her worst fault. 
She dislikes bookkeeping, while her 
best virtue is being on time. "Really," 
and "wait a minute" are "Doe's" fa- 
vorite expressions. Her destination is 
either a private secretary or good 
stenographer. Member of the Com- 
mercial Club. 



FRANCIS D. DOUGHERTY 

Business Course 

"Splinter" hopes to become a bank 
president, but he'd like to own a 
ranch with "Austie" and "Murphy" 
in Texas. We all know "Shorty" 
likes flashy ties. Waiting for Nick- 
erson and buying gas for the car are 
his dislikes. His best virtue is 
punctuality and drinking too many 
vanilla frappes is his worst fault. 
His activities include : Junior Prom 
Chairman, '41, Senior Play Commit- 
tee, '42, Sophomore and Junior Nom- 
inating Committee, Dramatic Club, 
Cheerleader, Honor Roll, '42. 



GORDON EARLE DUNBRACK 

Technical Course 

"Romeo wake up!" is "Tiger's" 
favorite expression. To meet Veron- 
ica Lake is Gordon's ambition. He 
would either like to go to the Water- 
town Arsenal or join the Marines 
with "Romeo." "Tiger's" favorite 
program is Crestfallen Manor with 
Ransom Sherman ; he also likes base- 
ball which is his hobby. He never 
does homework and dislikes punctual 
girls. Activities include : Volley ball 
1, 2, 3; Champs, 1, 2. Bouncer of 
4-B Club. 



ROBERT CAMPBELL EATON 

Practical Arts Course 

"Bob" hopes to study radio train- 
ing and become a Naval Radio Oper- 
ator. "You ain't lyin' " and "You 
can say that again" are his favorite 
expressions. He likes Friday night 
and a crowd, but not girls who steal 
a man's pride and joy (his pants). 
His best virtue is being on time. His 
many activities are Dramatc Club, 1, 
2; Nominating Committee, 2, 3; Oper- 
etta, hockey manager, I, 2; tennis, 2, 
3; band, 1, 2, 3; Senior Play. 




GRACE I. Di GREGORY 

Business Machines Course 

"Gra's" ambition is to travel and 
her hobby is pleasure trips. She likes 
cocoanut bars and gum and she is 
often heard snapping her gum, which 
is her worst fault. "Gra" dislikes 
conceited people and operas. "I'm 
starved" or "you're on the loose" is 
what "Gra" says most frequently. 
Helping others is her best virtue. 
Her activities include : Commercial 
Club, 1941-42 ; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. 



ROLLAND DION 

Practical Arts Course 

"Rollie" is one of our more ath- 
letic students, active in High School 
baseball in his soph year and in 
semi-pro baseball last year and this 
year. He was president of the Junior 
Class and he was Class marshal at 
Graduation 1941. 



DOROTHY E. DUFRESNE 

Stenographic Course 

Saving Defense Stamps is "Dot's" 
wonderful hobby. She likes Glenn 
Miller's Music and Bob Hope. "Dot" 
often says "Jiminy-Crickets." "Dot" 
dislikes lamb and one of her special 
mannerisms is using her hands while 
talking. Her ambition is to become 
a private secretary, while her desti- 
nation is to work in some office as a 
stenographer. "Dot" is a member of 
the Commercial Club. 



DORIS LORRAINE EASTMAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dot" likes knitting, hot fudge 
sundaes, and writing letters to service 
and college boys, but she dislikes 
breaking her long fingernails while 
twirling her baton. Activities are 
Drum Majorette for Waltham High 
School Band, 1, 2, 3; Member of 
the Executive Committee of the Dra- 
matic Club, 1, 2; Red Cross Knit- 
ting Club, 3. Her ambition is to at- 
tend Burdette College. She frequent- 
ly answers "Honest" or "Do you 
really mean it?" 



HELEN G. ECCLES 

Stenographic Course 

"You're not kidding," says "Jake" 
as she listens to Glenn Miller on the 
radio. Her best virtue is keeping 
early hours on week ends and her 
worst fault is arguing with "Mac." 
She hopes to become a private secre- 
tary after leaving high school. 






ELEANOR C. EDWARDSON 

Technical Course 

Eleanor's destination after high 
school is M. I. T. Her pet peeve is 
giggling girls but she likes boys 
with their hair combed. Her actiyites 
include Vice President of the IV-B 
Club ; Dramatic Club, the Senior 
Dance, Junior Prom, and Sophomore 
Social Committees. Her virtue is 
having been able to stand the Tech 
boys for three years. 



PHYLLIS MARIE ERICKSON 

Special Course 

"Phili's" ambition is to make 
everyone happy. Her hobbies are 
singing, whistling, and driving. Her 
dislikes are our short lunch periods, 
and carryng books. She often says 
"Get my lunch" or "Hurry up." 
"Phili" was in the Dramatic Club 
1941-'42. Her best virtue is making 
people laugh. 



EDWARD FRANCIS FENNELL 

Practical Arts Course 

"Buddy" is heard saying "Hi kid." 
Likes Red Skelton, movies, athletics. 
His main ambition is to join the navy 
or go to California or maybe both. 
Hobbies are sports and reading and 
worst fault is said to be bashfulness. 



ELAINE FITZGERALD 

Business Course 

Meet "Gerry" of the individual ex- 
pression "cela m'est egal." Ambition 
— private secretary, destination — 
Kismet, hobby — collecting boats. 
She dislikes serial programs and nar- 
row-minded people but likes reading 
and debating along with Red Skelton. 
Her worst fault is being a bad spel- 
ler but she makes up for it in vari- 
ous other ways. Her activities are : 
Commercial Club, Dramatic Club, 
Senior Play Committee, field hockey, 
basketball, volley ball, baseball, 1, 2, 
3, Tennis. 



AGNES DOROTHY FOLEY 

Business Course 

"Hi hon' " is one of "Aggie's" pet 
expressions, and having a good time 
and uniforms are her pet likes. "Ag- 
gie" wants to see the world, dance, 
and some day be a good private sec- 
retary, but she never wants to wait 
for any one. Activities are : High 
School reporter, N. J. H. Alumni 
Committee. She considers her worst 
fault to be having too much fun and 
modestly claims no best virtue. Her 
special mannerisms are winking and 
lifting her eyebrows. 




Kfiim 



GWENDOLYN ELROY 

College Course 

"Gwennie's" ambition is to go to 
Hawaii and her distination after high 
school is the Bouve Boston School of 
Physical Education. Her activities 
were figure skating, dancing, hockey, 
and horseback riding. Her pet likes 
are hula-hula dancing, and boogie- 
woogie music. 




JOHN ROBERT ERICKSON 

College Course 

Eric's ambition is to sell electric 
fans to the Eskimos. His pet peeves 
are neckties, homework and working 
days, and his likes are short pencils 
and days when Littlewood is absent. 
His activities include Hockey, 1 ; 
Vice President of the Dramatic Club, 
3 ; Chairman of Literary Committee 
on Mirror, 3 ; Senior Play Committee, 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2; Dramatic Club 
Plays, 2 ; and Graduation Usher, 2. 



LAURA FISH 

Practical Arts Course 

When not knitting for the Red 
Cross "Fishy" likes candy and cake. 
Jack Benny, and Baby Snooks. Dis- 
likes unavoidable homework and early 
rising, Hobby is reading but would 
like to work and establish a home of 
her own. Only fault is temper but 
best virtues include punctuality, and 
good behavior. Favorite expression 
is "Don't mind me, I just live here." 



HELEN JUDITH FITZGERALD 

College Course 

"Nellie" frequently queries "What's 
on the fire?" Hobbies are swimming 
and dancing perhaps because she 
wants to be a navy nurse. "Fitzie's" 
worst fault is just beating the bells, 
while her best virtue is patience. 
Likes Fred Waring and Bing Crosby, 
and activities include Sophomore Nom- 
inating Committee and all sports. 
Destination is Mass General Nurses' 
Training School. 



MARY I. FOLEY 

Business Course 

Activities include Sophomore and 
Junior sports and Commercial Club. 
Mary wants to work for a living, but 
likes skating and hiking. Dislikes 
loud people and considers her worst 
fault is being too quiet. Enjoys Lux 
Radio and Bing Crosby. Can be fre- 
quently heard saying "Oh you kid!" 



Class of 1942- 



ARLINE RUTH FOSTER 

College Course 

"Fossie" wants to be a successful 
secretary, but at present spends her 
spare time collecting snapshots. (of 
whom?) Her destination is Fisher's 
Business School. She likes Mr. 
Hodge's apples and York Beach, but 
dislikes early rising and watting. She 
admits her worst fault is impatience 
and her best virtue being on time. A 
mannerism is moving her fingers in 
air when memorizing. Activites are : 
field hockey, 1, 2, 3; basketball, 1, 
2, 3; bowling, 1, 2, 3; volley ball, 

1. 2, 3; baseball, 1, 2, 3; archery, 1, 

2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2. 3. Her fa- 
vorite expression is "What goes to- 
night, Shenna?" 

BARBARA JEAN FRASER 

College Course 

"Why sure" says "Barbs" as she 
happily chews her perpetual wad of 
gum. Our future nurse likes driving 
"Marg" and "Nick" to Weston for 
hamburgers, but dislikes getting up 
at 6 :30 and waiting for meals. Am- 
bition is to own a Great Dane. Des- 
tination is nurses' training school. Ac- 
tivities are basketball, 2, 3 ; Honor 
Roll, 2, 3; and undoubtedly her best 
virtue is smiling and laughing. Special 
mannerism is eating toothpicks. Weak- 
ness is Jack Benny, WORL (all day), 
WCOP (all night). Shame! 



KATHERINE ELIZABETH 
GALLAGHER 

College Course 

"Kay" is often heard to exclaim 
"Honest" or "So what!" She is an- 
other who dislikes the advertising on 
the 9 :20 Club. Her pet like is hos- 
pitals, which may account for her 
desire to be a nurse. "Kay's" hobby 
is sports and her activities include 
basketball, volley ball, and archery. 
GJenn Miller's Moonlight. Serenade is 
her favorite radio program. 



HELEN MAY GARBER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Puss" or "Shorty" as she is called, 
is often heard exclaiming, "Hey, 
kids! Wait for me!" Her hobby is 
writing letters and following the 
Harry Lee wherever it goes. She 
likes hot fudge sundaes, the 9:20 Club 
and receiving letters. The Alpineers 
is her favorite radio program and she 
says that being slow is her worst 
fault. Patience is her best virtue. 



JOHN RICHARD GARRIGAN 

Business Course 

To be successful in anything he 
does is A. G.'s ambition. He wants 
to join the army, so we hope he'll 
get his wish. He often says "What 
do you know, Joe" and admits that 
being late to class is a hobby. Read- 
ing and the 9:20 Club are among his 
likes and so is "raising the devil" 
with his pals. 




BARBARA ANN FOSTER 

Business Course 

"Red's" hobby is gardening, but 
her ambition is to be a private secre- 
tary! Activities are Commercial 
Club, Honor Roll, 2; basketball, 1, 
2, 3; archery, 2. A 9:20 Club fan 
she appreciates good dance music and 
likes sundaes. Dislikes stuck-up peo- 
ple and admits habit of losing tem- 
per. Strives always "to do my best." 



DORIS CAROLINE FRYE 

Business Course 

Sympathetic "Ditto" wants to travel 
and at the right moment get mar- 
ried, but while at home prefers danc- 
ing, bowling or ping pong. Ambition 
is to change his mind, but while wait- 
ing listens to I Love a Mystery. 
Likes classical music but would spend 
her last cent on the movies. Activ- 
ities include Mirror room agent 1940, 
Glee Club, '41, Commercial Club '42. 
"Holy Cow!" is most favorite ex- 
pression. 



ROBERT H. GALLAGHER 

"Hya kid" is "Gal's" stock phrase 
and he likes tennis and Glenn Mil- 
ler's music. He wants to become a 
pilot. His worst fault is lending 
money to Mac and he is another who 
has a dislike for the fair sex in 
slacks. His best virtue is getting to 
school on time. 



RICHARD JOHN GARDINER 

Accounting Course 

"Dick's" ambition is to make a big 
salary. When he's saved enough he 
wants to travel. He is often heard 
saying, "Is that so?" His favorite 
radio program is Truth or Conse- 
quences and his best virtue is not 
wasting money. He often scratches 
his head and blushes, which he says 
is his worst fault. 



MARIE E. GEISLER 

Stenographic Course 

"Twin's" ambition is to become a 
private secretary but while waiting 
she collects pins and gadgets as a 
hobby. She likes walking, dancing, 
and vanilla frappes but dislikes be- 
ing called by the wrong name. (Can 
»e help it?) Her pet expression is 
"Christopher" and she likes to listen 
to We, the People. Her special man- 
nerism is scuffing her feet. Activities 
include Mirror room agent 1941, Ex- 
change editor 1942, Commercial Club, 
School Sports, and Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3. 



„__„_, — , » „ Class of 1942- — «— — . 



MURIEL S. GEISLER 

Stenographic Course 

"Twiny" often says "Guess what!" 
She likes swimming, chocolate sun- 
daes, and 'skating. She hopes to be- 
some"' a private secretary and then to 
see the world and not on a globe. 
She- dislikes'! being callen "Marie" 
and her worst fault is getting into 
trouble. Henry Aldrich is her fa- 
vorite radio program and being on 
time* is her best virtue. Activities en- 
code' school sports. Commercial Club, 
and Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. 



JEANNETTE MERILDA 
' GOGUEN 

Business Machines Course 

"Jan" likes movies and plays and 
hopes to get a good job after grad- 
uating. She often says "It's amaz- 
ing" and her Tiobby is dancing. She 
dislikes loud people and says that 
being slow is her worst fault. She is 
a member of the Commercial Club. 
A special mannerism is raising her 
eyebrow. 



ARTHUR LESLIE GOODWIN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Slim" likes to read but dislikes 
homework (How odd!) "Telling big 
stories" and "sleeping in Democracy" 
are his worst faults. His hobby is 
making model airplanes and he wants 
to work out West on a farm some 
day. He is a member of the Dra- 
matic Club and enjoys listening to 
Death Valley Days. He dislikes 
tapping pencils and week end home- 
work. 



MERRILL GRAPES 

Practical Arts Course 

"Wr^tey" likes to spend money 
and "'raise Cain" and his ambition is 
to be another Rockefeller. His pet 
expression' is "Please" and he does 
not like fancy shirts or women (tch, 
tch). He hopes to end up in the 
Marines. 



PAUL A. GREEN ,,„ 

College Course 

"Take it easy" says Paul. Known 
to all as "Pea", he likes tall girls, 
Bob Hope, and all kinds of music. 
(9:20 Club, Paul?) He's keeping his 
destination a secret but we do know 
that his hobby is horseback riding 
and that movies take up an evening 
now and then. Paul doesn't like talk- 
ative people and says that although 
his worst fault is being lazy, his 
best virtue is being on time. Ac- 
tivities include Mirror room agent, 
Sophomore Dance Committee, Senior 
play usher. 




CATHERINE ROSE GIROLAMO 

Business Course 

"Kay's" ambition is to become a 
good housekeeper or a good account- 
ant. She spends her time reading, 
dancing, and bowling. Often she says 
"Jeepers" or "Gosh". She loves tuna 
sandwiches, fudge, and Mr. Hodge's 
apples. (Who doesn't?) Her favorite 
program is Red Skelton and her vir- 
tue is being frank. She dislikes snob- 
bish people and says her worst fault 
is criticizing. Activities include Com- 
mercal Club and Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. 



SUMNER JACOBS GOLDMAN 

Technical Course 

"Are you kiddin'?" says Goldie as 
he is informed of his loud snores in 
class. Our brawny football player's 
ambition is to be "vice president in 
charge of presidents of the IV B 
Club". He won't commit himself 
concerning his virtues (Bashful, 
Sum?) As for his hobby, yes we 
know, and if she's as nice as you say, 
well, she must be nice. "Jakie" 
likes Bob Hope's program and chop 
suey.' .Activities include Varsity foot- 
ball^ 1, 1} 3'.; and Senior play. 



HELEN GERTRUDE GRANT 

Business Course 

"Feddle faddle" says "Peanuts" as 
she goes about collecting her tie pins 
and trinkets. "Jimmy Dorsey's theme 
song gets me every time" she says 
and she' thinks Bob Hope and Jack 
Benny are' the ' "tops." "Peanuts" 
wants to leave Waltham on the first 
train and sing on Broadway. Some 
ambition! Blushing is her worst 
fault and activities include Sophomore 
Nomnating Committee, Commercial 
Club, "Naughty Marietta" and Ra- 
dio Club. 



ROBERT McLEAN GRAY 

Technical Course 

"Bob is the strong silent type of 
the Tech class. He doesn't seem to 
know what he likes or dislikes but 
we all like him. 



PAULINE GREENWOOD 



-Class of 1942 — — -™.___o__* 



MASON GRIFF 

Civic Course 

"Mace" doesn't like glamor girls 
or parties, strictly the quiet man. He 
spends his spare time trying to bowl 
200 and he likes other sports and 
swing. Fred Allen's program is his 
favorite and he hopes to go to 
Pharmacy School. 



LAWRENCE PATRICK 
HALLORAN 

Accounting Course 

"Larry" wants to be a certified 
accountant some day. He likes swim- 
ming and golf but dislikes slacks on 
women. His favorite expression is 
"Cut it out, will you?" 



CAROL M. HARTLEY 

Stenographic Course 

Would like to work in a govern- 
ment office in Washington but mean- 
while spends her time collecting 
menus and cream pitchers, 
include Commercial Club 
ball, field hockey and 
"Oh Crimony!" 
pression. Likes 
Skelton and 9:20 Club. 



Activities 
and base- 
basketball, 
is her favorite ex- 
to listen to Red 



LEONARD WERSTER HARVEY 

Rusiness Course 

"Professor" often says "Lo, beauti- 
ful." His ambition is to be a Cer- 
tified Public Accountant and go to 
Roston University but thinks the army 
will get him before this. Spends his 
spare time reading funny books and 
spending money on a certain H. S. 



ANASTASIA HAYES 

Rusiness Course 

"Sta" wants most in the world to 
become successful and then go to Ire- 
land. She enjoys Red Skelton's pro- 
gram and likes a good sport and ten- 
nis. Her activities include: Dramat- 
ic Club, Commercial Club, Mirror 
Room Agent, Field Hockey, and 
Baseball. You may hear her say, 
"Cela m'est Egal!" 




NAOMI LOUISE HAAG 

Stenographic Course 

"Nony" wants to become a famous 
singer and to travel through the 
Orient but is satisfied to fill her time 
for now with playing the piano and 
organ. She likes fried clams, Glenn 
Miller and red hair. Best virtue is 
her sense of humor. Activities in- 
clude Commercial Club singer, School 
Reporter, and North Junior Alumni 
Committee. You may hear her say, 
"Don't be a nut." 



FERNANDE JULIETTE HACHE 

Rusiness Course 

"Ferny" often says, "Cut it out!" 
Wants to become an accountant in an 
office. Spends lots of time talking 
and working on a Louis Hayward 
scrapbook. Gets a kick out of wrink- 
ling her eyebrows. Activities include 
being a member of the Commercial 
Club. 



RICHARD ALDEN HARTLEY 

Civic Course 

"Dick" enjoys swimming and hopes 
to become a railroad man some day. 
He likes banana-splits and listening 
to Rob Hope and Gay Nineties Re- 
vue. His dislike is getting up in 
morning but does so saying "So 
What? Times are tough." 



DOROTHY ROSALIND HAWKER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dot's" photography is her first 
step toward being a model where she 
will show her favorite like, clothes. 
Activities include South Junior Alum- 
nae, Dramatic Club, and getting other 
people out of trouble. Says her 
worst faults are not being on time and 
staying out late at night. 



MELVIN L. HAYDEN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dub" has been a busy man at 
high school doing this and that. 
Here are a few: Chairman of Senior 
Play Committee, Publicity Manager 
of Mirror, Dramatic Club Play, and 
back in the Sophomore year, a base- 
ball manager. "Mai" likes eccentric 
people and Benny Goodman but dis- 
likes sloppiness and morons! He 
wants to become a producer or play- 
write. Heard him say, "Not really!" 



*,_<_„_,_,_„«- .„_,<- .,>_ „_,,— „_««,„^d ass f 1942- 



EUGENE RONALD HECKMAN 

Business Course 

Have you heard "Where's the next 
class?" Could have been "Heck", 
who has the ambition of being a good 
American boy joining the Flying 
Force of the U. S. A. or being an 
aeronautical engineer. He enjoys out- 
door life and mathematicians. 



BARBARA RUTH HELLNER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Barb's" ambition is to be a singer 
of popular songs or a model. We 
know she'd do a good job of either. 
She likes dancing, skiing in New 
Hampshire, and mocha sodas. Often 
says, "Really!" 



CHARLES FREDERICK HENESY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Charlie's" ambition is to get a 
new Cadillac and go to work in a 
meat market. He dislikes girls in 
slacks but enjoys Bob Hope and 
white side wall tires. His activities 
include Dramatic Club, basketball, 
and usher at class day and gradution. 



BEVERLY WALTER HERSEY 

Business Course 

"Bev" wants to blow the Japs out 
of the sea when he joins the Navy. 
His hobby is driving an automobile 
or bowling. Says his worst fault is 
"flying off the handle." Often says 
for his favorite expression, "Well, 
for crying out loud." 



JOSEPH FRANCIS HILL, JR. 

Technical Course 

"Joe" intends to become a student 
at Boston College. His hobby is 
playing tennis and he hopes to make 
money enough to be a dollar- 
a-year man." Activities include, Pub- 
licity Manager of Mirror, Band, Ed- 
itor of the III A 3 Weakly, Mirror 
Room Agent, and Tennis Team. Pres. 
IV B Club, Usher — Class Day. Says, 
"How ya doin"?" Likes Bob Hope. 




ETHEL V. HELM 

Practical Arts Course 

"Vichy's" big ambition is to live 
an exciting life. She spends her 
time collecting jewelry. Her favorite 
radio program is Bob Hope while 
her favorite exprssion is "So that's 
right!" Her activities were Basket- 
ball and Field Hockey. 



HAROLD PHILIP HEMEON 

Special Course 

"Phil" expected to go to Divinity 

School, but says he will serve his 

country for now. His hobby is music 

while his favorite expression is, 
"Little one." 



HAROLD LAWRENCE HENLEY 

Technical Course 

"Harry" often says, "I'm sleepy," 
but his ambition is to wake up some 
day and become an apprentice at 
General Electric or Lowell Institute. 
Is president of IV B Club and a 
regular on varsity of IV B Ping- 
Pong Club. He likes 9 :20 Club mu- 
sic but dislikes their advertising. 



RITA MARGARET HICKEY 

Business Course 

"Rusty" would like to become a 
singer or an Air Hostess but for now 
spends her time collecting music. "Ri" 
often says, "You can say that again." 
She likes to chew gum but doesn't 
like to be called "Red". Her activ- 
ities include Mirror Room Agent, 
Commercial Club, Glee Club and B. 
B. B. Association. 



JOYCE HITCHCOCK 

College Course 

"Hitchy" wants to own a stable 
full of horses and go to Wheaton 
College. Likes to collect toy ani- 
mals, to eat butterscotch sundaes, and 
to wear earrings. She often says, 
"Holy Cow!" and also says her 
worst fault is talking too fast. She 
doesn't seem to know her best virtue. 
Her activities include Sophomore 
Nominating Committee, Sophomore 
Social Committee, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Co-editor of Mirror, and 
Senior Play Committee. 



-Class of 1942- — — — — . 



RALPH WILLIAM HITCHCOCK 

College Course 

"Hitch" would like to be either a 
lawyer or a wool merchant, but be- 
fore that he wants to go to B. U. 
or Lowell Textile. He likes to learn 
people's middle names, and also likes 
flashy clothes, classical music, and 
speaking to everyone. Often says, 
"Boy, that's classy!" 



■MARJORIE LORRAINE HOLLIS 

College Course 

"Margie" would like to go to B. 
U. or Framingham, and maybe write 
a book some day. She loves horses, 
dancing, new records, and sleep. 
Favorite expression is "Wow!" Has 
served on Literary Staff of Mirror, 
and as a member of Dramatic Club. 



HENRY E. HOPKINS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Hank" would; like to get a good 
job with a good inccme and maybe 
become a Commercial Artist. Likes 
roller skating, bowling, swimming, 
and Kay Kyser. 



THOMAS J. HURLEY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Tom" says, "So What!" Likes 
basketball, football, hockey. He 
would like to become a marine or 
join the Navy. He loves to argue 
with some one. 



MARTHA MARIE JOHNSON 

College Course 

Although "Little Butch" dislikes 
homework and chemistry she hopes to 
get to college. She often says "I 
didn't done it!" and she has a tem- 
per which she tries very hard to con- 
trol. Much of her time is taken up 
by photography, swimming, skating, 
fishing, and listening to Bob Hope. 
She also likes French fries, English, 
and the color red. 








iifcfcL* 




JOSEPH HOLICKER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Joe" wants to own a band that 
will play like Benny Goodman's whom 
he likes, along with Bob Hope, apple 
pie, tennis, sundaes, and girls. Listens 
to radio in his spare time which is 
little because of Band, Orchestra, 
Operetta, Senior Nominating Com- 
mittee, and Senior Dance Committee. 
Favorite expression is "Always kid- 
ding, aren't you?" 



BARBARA MAE HOPKINS 

Business Course 

"Hoppy's" ambition is to make 
other people happy. She would like 
to know where her destination is. 
Can you help her? Likes blue, danc- 
ing, Glenn Miller, and Hour of 
Charm. Says her worst fault is her 
stubborness which accounts for, "Coax 
me!"., Activities were Mirror room 
agent, Assembly accompanist. Com- 
mercial Club, and Senior Dance Com- 
mittee. 



SYBIL JEANETTE HUNTLEY 

Business Course 

"Sib" likes Howard Johnson's pep- 
permint ice cream and chocolate sauce. 
Would like to become a private sec- 
retary and work in a large business 
office. Activities include Commercial 
Club and reading. Says, "Don't you 
know it?" 



RUTH MARGUERITE JENSEN 

Business Course 

Ruth, often called "Swede" or 
"Blondic", is often heard to say 
"Fooey" or "So What!" She seems 
to like to get different jobs, but she 
hopes to hold a worthwhile position 
some day. She prides herself on lik- 
ing everybody, but also she has a 
bad habit of coming home late. Bob 
Hope, new clothes, and "B. C." are 
special likes of hers, but she 
thoroughly dislikes stubborn people, 
and classical songs jazzed. 



ROGER E. JOHNSON 

Technical Course 

"Rangy" hopes to be happy and 
successful in whatever he does, and 
to enter college in the future. He 
has played basketball 3 years, was in 
the band 2 years, Vice President of 
the Sophomore class, and was on the 
Sophomore and Senior Dance Com- 
mittees. Whenever "Roge" is around 
one may expect to hear him say 
"Sorry ! " 



^^.-.■n-.-ii-D-.^— (^..^^n^^l^gg ()f 1942*" 



SETH FOSTER JOHNSON 

Practical Arts Course 

"Sethie" often says "How to step 
into the apple, kid!" or "How's 
Sammy?" He is very fond of base- 
ball and hopes to become a major 
league player. Baseball, Hockey, and 
Football have been his school activ- 
ities. To end this war would please 
him. He enjoys eating hamburgers 
with Connie, and keeping his Ted 
Williams' scrap book. Seth dislikes 
dancing, considers that he has a bad 
disposition, and is too noisy and 
talkative. 



ELEANOR F. JONES 

Business Course 

Eleanor wants to become a secre- 
tary. She likes driving, dancing, and 
going out with a certain person. 
Field Hockey, Basketball, and Base- 
ball have been her High School 
sports. She was on the Sophomore 
Social Committee, and a member of 
the Commercial Club. "Holy Cow" 
is her favorite expression. 



DOROTHEA ANN JOYCE 

College Course 

"Dottie" has an ambition to get the 
family car, and often wants to know 
"What are you doing tonight?" Al- 
though she is always getting into 
trouble, she is good-natured and likes 
to raise "heck" with the gang. She 
dislikes getting up early, and school. 
Photography is her hobby. She wants 
to go to Boston University. 



JEANETTE IRMA KAUFMAN 

College Course 

An ambitious nature our Jeanie 
has! Her destination is the New 
England Conservatory of Music, and 
her ambition, to be a concert pianist. 
This Music Editor of the Mirror 
especially dislikes people who "swing 
the classics", and especially likes eat- 
ing and listening to the Classical Al- 
bum Hour. We certainly wish you 
luck, Jeanette. 



PAULINE OLIVE KELLEY 

Stenographic Course 

Good-natured "Polly" likes ham- 
burgers, orange cakes, and that last 
bell on Friday, as who doesn't? She 
is continually saying, "It could be 
fun if" — "but, oh dear!" We 
wonder if her pet dislike, homework, 
has anything to do with this. "Paul" 
hopes first to be a good stenographer, 
and next to see the world. Quite an 
ambition ! 




WILLIAM ARTHUR JOHNSTON 

Civic Course 

Bill hopes to be successful, es- 
pecially as a salesman. "O. K. kid," 
"Says Who," and "Ya" are his 
favorite expressions. He is very fond 
of all sports, Kay Kyser, Bob Hope, 
and the 9 :20 Club are his radio fa- 
vorites. He considers that staying 
out late is his worst fault. 



HENRY JOYAL 

Business Course 

Henry was on the Senior Dance 
Committee, and has played golf, base- 
ball, and football. He hopes to at- 
tend Franklin Marshall College in 
Penn., and to become a professional 
golfer. Watching alL kinds of sports, 
and listening to The Shadow, and 
Henry Aldrich are his favorite pas- 
times. He often says "Is that good?" 
"Sorry", "Scrouage". His worst 
fault is lending money to Erickson. 



FRANCES KANE 

Business Course 

"Fancy" always has a good excuse 
— perhaps that's why she is always 
saying "Don't work too hard!" I'm 
sure she'd rather be dancing, or at- 
tending Dramatic Club meetings. 
Her ambition is to be a private sec- 
retary, and her hobby, of all things, 
"eating Indian nuts!" 



JOAN FRANCES KAVANAUGH 

Teachers' College Course 

Our "shy and mouselike" Johnny 
is uncertain as to her destination. 
But she does like getting the car for 
the day and the radio program, "I 
Love a Mystery." We bet her worst 
fault, "putting off things," doesn't 
apply to her pet dislike, "staying 
home from a good movie." 



ROBERT W. KELLY 

Stenographic Course 

"Kel," "Irish," or "Bob" as you 
prefer claims his worst fault is be- 
ing late, but he "gets there- event- 
ually" anyway. He is planning to 
go to the U. S. Naval Air Base, 
Pensacola, Florida. Meanwhile he 
would like to travel, including tak- 
ing bike trips through New England 
with "Chic." He likes hockey, 9:20 
Club, black and white sodas, and a 
certain little sophomore. Activities : 
Chairman of Sophomore Social Com- 
mittee ; Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; Com- 
mercial Club; Advertising Staff of 
Mirror; Dramatic Club Plays, 1, 2, 3. 



Class of 1942™- 



JUNE EDITH KELLOG 

Business Course 

Our friendly "Pep" is always in- 
quiring about any new effortless way 
to reduce. She likes Swedes, animals, 
dancing, singing, and chewing gum in 
school. She dislikes "fresh people," 
and "crabby teachers" — her own 
words. She belongs to the Dramatic 
Club, the Commercial Club and was 
the Auditor of her class '40. 




AUDREY KILGORE 

Business Course 

Audrey is Waltham High's Greta 
Garbo," or so we are led to believe. 
All she wants her public to know is, 
that she wants to become an efficient 
secretary. Outside of that, "She 
wants to be alone!" 



DORIS ANN KILPATRICK 

College Course 

"Dodo" hopes some day to be a 
singer, and also wants "to go in 
training at the Cambridge Hospital." 
Our lively '40-'41 Cheerleader has 
served on the Junior Prom Committee, 
the Senior Dance Committee, the 
Senior Nominating Committee, Field 
Hockey team, and basketball team. 
She likes brownies, Kay Kyser, Sam- 
my Kaye and people. She especially 
dislikes 9:20 Club advertisements. 
She's always trying to whistle when 
she's not, "talking too much." 



GENEVIEVE MARIE 
LaBOMBARD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Gen" is often heard saying "oh 
shush" and that favorite, "What 
will I wear tonight 1 ?" She collects 
napkins and menus for a hobby and 
her likes include drinking cokes and 
Inner Sanctum. Her pet peeves are 
her short fingers and bashful people. 
Her best virtue is being on time. 
"Gen" wants to go to business school 
and be a success in life. 



RAYMOND CHARLES LACASSE 

Civics Course 

"Froggy" (Ray to those who speak 
English) would like to join the Coast 
Guard. He'd like to earn $100 a 
week and retire at an early age, too. 
"You ain't lying" is his favorite ex- 
pression. Airplane models and base- 
ball are his hobbies and popular or- 
chestras. Bob Hope and Red Skelton 
are some of his likes. 




**Js* 




BETTE KENNEDY 

Stenographic Course 

"Half Pint" has a deep secret! 
All we may reveal is that she's 
"carrying the torch." She hates 
empty mailboxes, and "cutters-in" in 
the cafeteria. She likes fudge sun- 
daes, jewelry, Bob Hope, Red Skel- 
ton, and "Happy." "Life is so dis- 
concerting!" we hear her say as we 



leave her with her wishful thinking. 
HAROLD EDWARD KILLAM 

Technical Course 

Our patient and punctual Harry 
likes blondes, eating, swimming, camp- 
ing, and Henry Aldrich. Here's a 
slam for you, girls — he dislikes 
girls in slacks, ahem! He wants to 
be a Chemical engineer, and hopes to 
attend the General Electric Training 
School. By the way of hobbies, he 
prefers stamp collecting and chemis- 
try. 



GEORGE KLINK 

Trade School 



JOHN FREEMAN 
LACKENBAUER 

Practical Arts Course 

Jack wants to study aeronautics 
and be a pilot in the United States 
Navy. His favorite saying is "Hi, 
bub" and his hobby is sports. He 
likes jokes. Bob Hope, Glenn Miller 
and blue eyes. His activities include 
Art Editor of Mirror 1941-'42 and 
Assistant Art Editor 1940-'41. 



CHARLES S. LANE 

Business Course 

"Chic's" destination is the L T nited 
States Army Air Corps. His hobbies 
are stamps, guide service, and, most 
certainly, school activities. His fa- 
vorite expression is "It sure is." 
Girls, sports, and eating are some of 
his likes. His many activities include 
Sophomore Social Committee, Mirror 
Room Agent, Senor Play Cast, Dra- 
matic Club, Advertising Chairman — 
Senior Play, Commercial Club, Senior 
Notes, Basketball, 1940-'41. 



„_«h-.o_ — — =Class of 1942- — — — — ~™ ,h 



MARGARET SARAH LANGILLE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Margie," or "Meg," expects to 
study to be a dietician. Her favorite 
expression is "Holy Cats," and her 
hobby is riding roller-coasters. She 
is a 9:20 Club fan and also likes 
Inner Sanctum. Writing letters is 
one of her pet dislikes. She was in 
the chorus of "Naughty Marietta" in 
1941. 



LORRAINE ELMIRA LaROSEE 

Special Course 

Lorraine's hobby is sewing, and so 
her ambition is to do something in 
the field of clothing. "Golly" is her 
pet expression. She doesn't like the 
9:20 Club, but she does like the 
movies. Paying her bills is her best 
virtue and being sarcastic her worst 
fault. 



BARBARA LASSEN 

College Course 

Barbara is an active member in 
school sports. This includes field 
hockey, basketball, volley ball, bowl- 
ing, baseball, and archery. Barb's 
best virtue is listening to other people 
talk. Her pet dislike is "gushy" 
people, while he favorite radio pro- 
gram is Glenn Miller. 



FRANCIS JACQUES LeBLANC 

Technical Course 

"Frenchy", or "Libby" expects to 
attend Northeastern and become an 
aeronautical engineer. His hobby, of 
course, is making model airplanes. 
His favorite expression is "Singularly 
amazing!" and he's often heard say- 
ing, "Will you please explain that 
problem again, Miss Spencer?" He's 
the president of the IV B Club. 



MARIE PHYLLIS LeBLANC 

Business Course 

"Fishday" is Marie's odd nickname. 

"Such is life" is her favorite ex- 
pression. Her ambition is to be a 
secretary and her hobby is sports. 
She dislikes waiting for people, but 
she is always late herself. Glenn 
Miller is her favorite orchestra ; choc- 
olate sundaes, her weakness. Her ac- 
tivities are Commercial Club, field 
hockey, 1, 2; basketball, 1; baseball, 
1 ; volley ball, 1. 




JAMES RICHARD LaROSEE, JR. 

Business Course 

Although Jimmy's ambition is to 
be a traveling secretary, his destina- 
tion is the United States Air Corps. 
"1-2-3-4, I don't care if I live any- 
more" is his favorite expression and 
photography his particular hobby. He 
likes the quiet lassies, (not sassy 
red heads) and Dinah Shore's pro- 
gram. His worst fault is not wearing 
neckties. His activities include foot- 
ball 1939-'40-'41, baseball manager, 
1941-'42, Commercial Club, and pres- 
ident of Senior Class. 



ALBERT ENDICOTTE LARSON 

Practical Arts Course 

Alley (alias Max, Willy, Major, 
Emery) expects to join the Marines 
or go to the University of Texas 
and then join the Naval Air Corps. 
He likes swimming, golf, and Bob 
Hope, but not radio announcers and 
salesmen. His worst fault is sleeping 
too much and his pet expression is 
"The man they could not hang." 
Activities include basketball, 1 ; base- 
ball, 1; tennis, 1; football, 1, 3; 
Nominating Committee, 1. 



ELIOT I. LEAF 

Civic Course 

Eliot's destination is forestry school. 
He then wants to travel and obtain 
a job. His pet expression is "Good- 
bye now." He admits he's too quiet, 
but believes his best virtue is being 
pleasant. Studying the stars for as- 
tronomy is his hobby, along with 
reading and bowling. He dislikes 
girls who smoke and people who 
boast. His activities include basket- 
ball, 1, 2; golf, 1, 2. 



HOWARD FRANCIS LeBLANC 

Civic Course 

"Howie" would like to become a 
welder, and his ambition is to travel 
and to get rich over night. He likes 
sports, the 9:20 Club, and Glenn 
Miller. His worst fault is talking 
too much and being quick-tempered. 
His activities include Senior Dance 
Committee, football, 2; baseball, 2. 



MILDRED VIRGINIA LeCAIN 

Business Course 

"Milly" wants to be a secretary 
and her ambition is to travel. Her 
pet expression is "Hi ya, kid." She 
likes Lux Radio, hamburgers, and 
chicken sandwiches. Her hobbies are 
bowling, scrapbook of the war, and 
driving. Bowling, 1, 2; Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3; and baseball, 1 are her 
school activities. 



—Class of 1942— "—• ■ — ■ — — 



MADELEINE E. LEWIS 

College Course 

"Boom, Boom" ends her patience 
with Mary by shouting, "You drive 
me crazy." Madeleine spends most of 
her money and of others in the cafe- 
teria buying food. She just loves to 
eat. Secretarial School is her desti- 
nation after graduating. From there 
she's going to be "just a good wife." 
She likes sweaters, soldiers and color 
blue, but dislikes jealous, conceited 
boys. Spends Sunday nights listen- 
ing to Inner Sanctum and spends her 
school days kidding "Kelly." 



CARL JOHN LoPRESTI 

Practical Arts Course 

Carl's destination is the footlights 
— as an American idol. His hobby 
is impersonating teachers and his pet 
expression is "I decline to being 
killed." His worst fault is doing 
only what he thinks is right, while 
his best virtue is cheerfulness. Bob 
Hope and President Roosevelt are his 
favorite radio personalities. His ac- 
tivities are Dramatic Club and Radio 
Guild. 



ELLIOT P. LYON 

Practical Arts Course 

"El" believes his destination is the 
draft (naturally), but his ambition is 
the engineering field or the Army 
Air Corps. His pet saying is "Zat 
so?" His worst fault is staying up 
nights and he doesn't like girls in 
slacks. Elliot was on the Sopho- 
more Dance Committee. 



ANN ELIZABETH MacDONALD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Take it easy," advises "Mac". 
This future nurse wants to go moon 
gazing. Likes horse back riding, 
dogs, and Red Skelton. Her worst 
fault is spending money, and her 
best virtue is smiling. 



GEORGE JOSEPH MacLAUGH- 
LIN 

Civic Course 

The U. S. Navy is "Red's" am- 
bition. Frequently scratches his head, 
and admits being too frank. Likes 
chocolate milk shakes and 9:20 Club. 
Says he hasn't any virtues. "Mac" 
was a Mirror Room Agent in '41-42. 




GEORGE LAWRENCE LITTLE- 
WOOD 

College Course 

George (alias "petit-bois") hopes 
to go to Boston Gefllege. His am- 
bition is to join the Army Air Corps. 
"What's the story?" is his favorite 
saying. His hobby is getting "Moi- 
on"-son mad. Not doing his algebra 
homework is his virtue. He was on 
the Honor Roll, 1, 2. 



RONALD GARFIELD LUND 

Technical Course 

"Good egg" is "Tiny's" favorite 
expression, and it seems to be his 
best virtue also. His destination is 
the Watertown Arsenal. Some of his 
hobbies are photography and coin col- 
lecting. Sleeping is very common to 
him and he loves it, but he doesn't 
like homework. He's the janitor of 
the IV B Club and he played foot- 
ball, '41. 



PHYLLIS E. MacARTHUR 

Business Course 

"Phyl", whose favorite expression 
is "What's your hurry?" wants to 
see the world and then work in an 
office. She likes Red Skelton and 
sports. Senior Nominating Commit- 
tee, Sophomore Social Committee, 
Commercial Club, Field Hockey, 
Basketball, and Volley Ball, 1, 2, 3 
are some of her activities. She was 
also captain of basketball, 1941 -'42, 
and captain of volley ball, 1941. 



FRANCIS DEEHAN MacDOU- 
GALL 

Practical Arts Course 

Such nicknames as "Mac," "Sandy," 
and "Scotty" help give a slight clue 
to Fran's ancestry! He plans to 
enter a school of journalism and 
eventually enter the field of adver- 
tising. His faults are too numerous 
to mention, and he puts cod liver oil 
and Hitler together as his chief dis- 
likes. His best virtue is keeping his 
hair combed. 



BEVERLY ANN MacNALLY 

Business Course 

Good-natured, easy-going "Boots" 
wants to work in an office for Uncle 
Sam. Cmmercial Club, '42; Bowling, 
1, 2, 3; roller skating, and dancing 
have kept her busy. She enjoys eat- 
ing potato chips, drinking cokes with 
"Wendy," 9:20 Club, and Glenn 
Miller. "Come on Wendy, hurry 
up," is her favorite expression, and 
she dislikes conceited people. 






= Class of 1942~ — ———<>——<—<—<«-.—_ 



FRANCIS JOHN MALLIN 

Practical Arts Course 

After starring in football, baseball, 
and basketball, "Big Gun" is head- 
ing for prep school and then the U. 
S. Navy. Admits he makes noises 
in class, and gets too many conduct 
cards. "No mustard," says this 
woman-hater who states his best virtue 
is not going out with females. Likes 
Bob Hope and chocolate frappes. 



MARY LOUISE MANCUSO 

Business Course 

"What a lulu!" exclaims "Lefty," 
a girl who wants to be an air hostess 
and then settle down with the "right 
one." She enjoys eating, sleeping, 
dancing and Inner Sanctum. Worst 
fault is blushing and best virtue is 
being sympathetic. Rolls her eyes to 
emphasize a point. Dislikes the sight 
of women smoking, red-headed boys, 
and operatic music. 



LEONA RUTH MARGOLIS 

Business Course 

"Shorty" wishes to become a good 
clerical worker and to be successful 
in the business world. She likes 
singing and dancing enough to make 
them her hobby. Dramatic Club, 
Commercial Club are among her ac- 
tivities. 



PALMA MARY MARTORELLI 

Business Course 

"Marty's" big fault is listening to 
other people's troubles. Most of her 
leisure time is spent in eating and 
going to the movies. She enjoys listen- 
ing to radio programs and good music. 
A member of the Commercial Club, 
Palma was on the honor roll, 1, 2. 



ANNE MARIE MAY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Hon" yearns to settle down and 
raise chickens (1 t) but before that 
she intends to go to Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Missouri. She likes gardenias, 
(expensive girl) cokes, and Glenn 
Miller. She states that her special 
mannerism is day dreaming — in 
school I'll bet! 




FREDERICK H. MALONE 



VINCENT MARINO MANDILE 

Business Course 

"Mandy", whose hobby is roller 
skating, wants to get a steady job. 
His favorite expression is "Yeah, 
sure," Destination is the Marines. 



HENRY JOSEPH MANIACE 

Business Course 

"Hi Ho," says "Minnie," a col- 
lector of rare coins. Wants to get 
a job as a business manager and be- 
come a success. Gang Busters is his 
favorite program. 



ROBERT A. MAXWELL 

Business Course 

"Bob", when asked, "How are 
you?" always answers, "Oh, I still 
manage to stagger around." His am- 
bition is to join his father in the 
Navy because he thinks that there 
he'll see the most action. "Bob's" 
fond of driving along country roads. 
Who with? 1 



JOAN ANN McCLUTCHY 

College Course 

"McClutch's" hobby is studying for 
next Friday's chem test, probably the 
reason why she raises her left eye- 
brow. Although disliking that 7 :00 
A. M. Monday morning feeling, people 
who "pretend," and a boy who needs 
a shave, she derives a great deal of 
pleasure out of those daily confabs 
at "Giard's," and H. H.'s meetings 
at Carol's. Some of her activities 
are: Dramatic Club, Radio Club. 
Senior Play Committee, and co-editor 
of Mirror 1941-'42. College is her 
destination, and "I don't believe it," 
her favorite expression. 



I 
■ 

1 
■ 
■ 
■ 
■ 
II 
1 
II 

Ml 
Ml 
Ml 

1 

i 



FRANCES ANN McCOURT 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jeepers" is "Fran's" favorite ex- 
pression. Her only ambition is to 
some day travel around the world. 
(What world?) Her hobby js a 
timely one, collecting tinfoil. Some 
day you'll hear her saying "Number 
puleese." She was on the Honor Roll 
2. 



MARY ALICE MELLEDY 

College Course 

"Oh shucks," says "sis" a future 
navy nurse. Dogs, Kay Kyser, danc- 
ing, and sports are her pet likes. Ad- 
mits tripping over people is her worst 
fault but says being on time is her 
best virtue. Hockey, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball. 1, 2, 3; Volley ball, 1, 2, 3; 
Soft ball, 1, 2, 3; and archery, 1, 2, 
3, kept her busy. Destination is a 
nurses' training school. 



ELINOR MERRILL 

College Course 

"Elinor Bee' wants to travel, at- 
tend business school, and be a good 
secretary. She likes hot fudge sun- 
daes, swimming, Bob Hope, Bing 
Crosby and the color blue. Admits 
she says the wrong thing at the 
wrong time but makes up for it by 
her omni-present smiles. Plays the 
piano as a hobby and dislikes car- 
rots. Activities include bowling and 
archery. 



JOSEPHINE MARY METZ 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jo" wants to become either a 
nurse, or a professional roller skater. 
Is there any connection? Naturally 
her hobby and her greatest weakness 
is roller skating. Generally "Joan's" 
favorite expressions are "Honest?" 
and "Really?" showing she's of a 
skeptical nature. 



ROBERT JOHN MILLER 

College Course 

"Bing", the future U. S. Senator, 
exclaims "You know what I mean," 
and hopes to attend Bemis Naval 
Academy. Played two years of foot- 
ball and now spends his time doing 
homework. (Now you tell one!) Ad- 
mits he needs a shave, and that be- 
cause of too much eating, is getting 
to shape up like Goldman. 



•"-Class of 1942- — — — o_„_,_„_„_o«» 




MARY MEEGAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dimples" or "Muggins" often 
says "Aw Cut it Out." Mary's likes 
are boys, smooth music, and dancing, 
and her one dislike the way Mr. 
Roach pronounces Mary. Doing what 
Hawker wants to do is her worst 
fault. To own an estate in New 
Hampshire is her fond ambition. Her 
destination is a telephone office. 



LILLIAN GERALDINE MERINO 

College Course 

"Lil", alias "Shanghai" or "Gerry" 
intends to enter the Rhode Island 
Training Hospital and be a Navy 
Nurse. If you hear "Is that good?" 
"Gerry" is sure to be around. Her 
best virtues are being generous and 
looking innocent. Activities include 
Field Hockey, '39, Senior Play. 



EDWARD HAGOP MESROBIAN 

Business Course 

"Zim Zam Zum's" hobby is draw- 
ing, therefore he wishes to draw a 
comic strip after graduation. "Ed" 
says that finding fault with women 
drivers is his worst fault; but who 
can blame him for that? He likes 
taking long walks. Maybe that's why 
he went out for football in his senior 
year! 



MARY J. MIGNOSA 

Business Course 

After working on her brother's farm, 
"Curlytop" wants to be a gym 
teacher. Likes apples and Lux Radio 
Program. Her hobby is sports and 
her favorite expression is "Dear, 
dear." Activities include Commer- 
cial Club, Bowling, and Basketball. 



RUTH PATRICIA MITCHELL 

Business Course 

"Mitch" is continually saying, "Oh 
yeah". Her only ambition is to suc- 
ceed in something and The Super 
Quality Doughnut Shop is her desti- 
nation. Let's hope she succeeds there. 
Her activities are field hockey, bas- 
ketball, baseball, volley ball. Com- 
mercial Club, Nominating Committee 
of Commercial Club. 



-Class of 1942- 



LEO ARTHUR MOGAN 

Practical Arts Course 

Give "twenty bucks and a horse 
blanket" to "Snuffy" and he claims 
he will have attained his ambition! 
Actually, he plans to work for the 
American Tel. and Tel. His hobby 
is photography. He dislikes having 
to "get up in the middle of night 
and go to school." His worst fault 
is listening to Collura. 



WALTER KENNETH MORRISON 

College Course 

"Walla's" ambition is to be ambi- 
tious. He spends his spare time col- 
lecting guns and says his destination 
is "the cruel world." Has a fond- 
ness for his haircut and Kraft Music 
Hall. Dislikes Littlewood and has a 
prejudice against short, fat young- 
sters. Best virtue is his admirable 
self-restraint. Activities include ush- 
ering at class day and graduation. 
Dramatic Club, and Senior Play Com- 
mittee. 



JOHN JOSEPH MURPHY 

Practical Arts Course 

To get out of here and then go to 
Russia and make a million is 
"Murph's" ambition. Laughing at 
Newton is his hobby and "Beauti- 
ful Situation" is his favorite expres- 
sion. "Joe" likes the way teachers 
hand out sessions with a smile and 
the ever-popular 9:20 Club. Lending 
dimes is his best virtue, coming to 
school late his worst fault, and cafe- 
teria menus his principal dislike. 



BARBARA LOUISE MYSHRALL 

Special Course 

Dancing, knitting, and eating super 
sundaes are a few of "Barb's" hob- 
bies.' Aften asks "Are you serious?" 
Ambition is to become a nurse. Likes 
Glenn Miller, Red Skelton, clothes, 
and bright finger nail polish. Has 
a dislike for people who snap gum, 
and confesses that her worst fault is 
teasing Anne S. Patience is her best 
virtue, and long finger nails are her 
special mannerism. 



LOREN PHILLIPS NEFF 

Practical Arts Course 

"Test Tube Tessie", or "the Pro- 
fessor" as he is also called has cen- 
sored his own favorite expressions so 
we shall have to guess what they 
are ! He hopes to continue further 
in school to better fit himself for the 
"battle of business." He is inter- 
ested in fixing watches and the Radio 
Club. Procrastination is his worst 
fault and a southwestern accent his 
special characteristic. 




ROGER ELLIOTT MORRIS 

Technical Course 

"Well?" inquires "Rog" whose am- 
bition is an army commission. Al- 
though a member of the Senior Band, 
1, 2, 3 and Dramatic Club, 3, he 
still manages to have time for his 
hobby — getting into trouble. Likes 
Bob Hope, Kay Kyser, and most 
people. His worst faults are writing, 
poor compositions and talking too 
much. 



JAMES J. MULA 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jungle Jim" is heading for U. of 
Texas and then a lieutenancy in the 
U. S. Marines. "It's brutal. It's 
more than an ordinary man can 
stand" remarks Jim as he banks the 
eight ball. Played football three 
years, probably accounting for his 
dislike — smoking. Lending money, 
letting his beard grow, and always 
singing are characteristic of this 
kind soul. 



KENNETH PAUL MURPHY 

"Ken", who greets friends and ene- 
mies with "Hi kid," wants to make 
a name for himself via the U. S. 
Marine Air Corps. Likes blondes, 
sports, Glenn Miller, Mr. Hodge's 
apples, and chocolate frappes. Con- 
fesses to falling asleep in astronomy 
and reveals that buying Mallin ice 
creams is his best virtue. Activities 
include baseball, 1, 3; basketball, 1, 
3; and tennis, 1. Also ushered at 
football games, class day, and grad- 
uation. 



FRED NEAL 

Practical Arts Course 

Fred is so bashful he doesn't say 
much about himself. He expects that 
before Uncle Sam calls for him he 
will see something of the world, if 
there is any left to see. 



HERBERT EDWIN NELSON 

Technical Course 

"Herbie" has an ambition to own 
a bankbook after attending a techni- 
cal school. "Hi girlie" seems to be 
his favorite expression and collecting 
old tires his hobby. His activities 
in W. H. S. consisted of sophomore 
class president, honor roll, 1, 2, 3; 
baseball, and censor of 4 B Club. 
Among his likes are good clothes and 
Bob Burns, while taking his time is 
his worst fault. 



I 

1 
1 
1 
II 
II 
I 
I 

1 
I 
1 
■ 
■ 
Ml 
Ml 



-Class of 1942- 



KENNETH EARL NICKERSON 

Business Course 

"Ken" or "Nick" is an outdoor 
man. As proof of this his activities 
include football, 2, 3 ; tennis, 2, 3 ; 
hockey, 2, 3. His hobby is sports 
in general. His other activities are 
Junior Nominating Committee, chair- 
man of the Senior Nominating Com- 
mittee, Senior Dance Committee and 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Junior 
class. His ambition is to be a busi- 
ness executive. Eating, brunettes, and 
Glenn Miller are his pet likes and 
people with a temper are his dislike. 
His worst fault is being late. 



JEAN ELIZABETH NOLAN 

Business Course 

"Oh Joy!" is "Nolie's" favorite 
expression. She hopes to see America 
and then become a secretary. Com- 
mercial Club, basketball, baseball, 
field hockey and honor roll, 1, 2 are 
among her many activities. Her hob- 
by consists of collecting certain let- 
ters. Frowning unconsciously and 
laughing at the wrong time constitute 
her worst faults. She likes Red 
Skelton's program and walking in the 
rain. 



AUDREY ALBERTA NYSTROM 

Practical Arts Course 

To be a dental hygienist after 
attending Forsythe College is "Schus- 
snut's" destination. "More fun!" 
and "Coming Ruthie?" are her stand- 
by sayings. Swedes, driving, Glenn 
Miller, skiing and knitting are in- 
cluded in her likes. She dislikes be- 
ing called "Aud" and conceited 
people. Her mannerism is pouting. 
Her activities include Mirror Room 
Agent, 1940, and Dramatic Club. 



MARJORIE ELIZABETH O HARE 

College Course 

"Marge" would like to be an air 
hostess, and therefore plans to enter 
nurse's training school. She was a 
member of the Senior Dance Com- 
mittee, and a Mirror Room Agent. 
Her activities were basketball, 2, 3 ; 
and baseball, 2, 3. She likes play- 
ing tennis, eating filberts, going to 
Potes, and going to basketball games 
with Carol. She dislikes being so 
short. 



CHARLES EDWARD OLNEY 

College Course 

A collecter of hot records, "Char- 
lie" wants to enter a technical school, 
and then to visit Scotland. "Bud" was 
a member of the band, 1, 2: treasurer 
of the IV B Club, and was on the 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. He likes Glenn 
Miller, the Ford Sunday Evening 
Hour, and sailing. Biting his finger- 
nails is his worst fault, and he us- 
ually says "You ain't kidding, or 
"Take it easy." 




FRANCES ELIZABETH NOBILE 

Business Course 

"Frannie" hopes to become success- 
ful in the business world and to visit 
the South Sea Islands some day. Col- 
lecting novelty pins is her hobby 
and she likes bowling, Xavier Cugart, 
music and apples. Her worst fault 
is being temperamental, and staying at 
home is her pet dislike. Her activi- 
ties include the Commercial Club and 
Honor Roll, I, 2. She often is heard 
saying "What's Cookin"?" 



BARBARA MARION NOYES 

Business Course 

"Babs" would like to become a 
foreign correspondent but until then 
she wishes to work in an office. Her 
worst fault and habit is chewing 
gum and a special mannerism is rais- 
ing one eyebrow. She likes Inner 
Sanctum and short fingernails. Her 
activities are Dramatic Club, basket- 
ball, bowling and honor roll. "Holy 
Smokes!" is one of her favorite 
phrases. 



THOMAS FRANCIS O'BRIEN 

Civic Course 

"Kitten", who spends his time read- 
ing, writing stories, playing golf, 
and eating, frequently says "What's 
say," or "Hi, Neighbor." He would 
like to join the Navy or be a golf 
pro. His activities include Golf and 
Hockey, and his worst fault is talk- 
ing too loud. He claims he dislikes 
girls, but he does like eating raw 
vegetables, going to the dentist, go- 
ing to the movies. Bob Hope, and 
the "Lone Ranger." 



MARJORIE ALICE OLDING 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dinny" wants to be a hairdresser 
after leaving a hair dressing school. 
She collects snapshots, likes ice skat- 
ing, and the color blue. Although 
she is patient, she dislikes conceited 
people and being called "Maggie". A 
fan of Red Skelton and Glenn Miller, 
her worst fault is chewing gum in 
Mr. May's physics class on Fridays. 



GEORGE E. OLSON, JR. 

Technical Course 

"Esmerelda", who plays the drums 
for P. Green, wants to take a course 
in plastics. Some day he hopes to 
own a plastic airplane factory or be 
a floorwalker in a telephone booth. 
"Junior" frequently says ' 'You're 
not mad are you?" He likes new 
clothes and everything else. He 
makes up for bothering Nelson and 
Thomas in English by passing out 
gum and candy to the boys in IV B. 






RICHARD E. OLSON 

Technical Course 

After working and going to North- 
eastern, "Swede" wants to be a chem- 
ical engineer. The president of the 
IV B Club, he dislikes waiting for 
Betty along with doing physics prob- 
lems. He likes Glenn Miller, the 
technical course, being on the Honor 
Roll, and having his homework done. 
He often says "Egad! what a man!" 
but tries to keep his language from 
being profane. His very special 
mannerism is going into a daze. 



THERESA JEAN ORNER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Tess", who often says "You ain't 
fooling" hopes to become a success 
in everything she does, and also to 
get married. She likes a certain tall 
brunette, swimming, dancing, the 
"Green Hornet", and working at a 
certain store. She also likes chop suey 
and juicy fat steaks smothered with 
onions. Her best and favorite color 
is blue. 



ERNEST JOSEPH PARRELLA 

Accounting Course 

"Ernie" loves to eat and drive. I 
guess that is why his ambition is to 
drive a truck around the United 
States. Reading funny books and 
sports are his hobbies. His destina- 
tion is the army. "Ernie's" worst 
fault is biting his fingernails. He 
enjoys listening to Fibber McGee 
and Molly. 



MARY ANNE PAVONE 

College Course 

To attend Simmons College is 
Mary's destination. Often says, "Oh 
for! Gee! No kiddin' ! " She dis- 
likes silly and conceited people. Pine- 
apple sundaes, dancing, and bowling 
are her pet likes. Appearing inter- 
ested in a dull conversation is her 
best virtue, while borrowing money 
is her worst fault. Favorite program 
is Glenn Miller's Sunset Serenade. 
Activities include Mirror Room Agent 
2, 3. 4 ; Senior Play Committee. 



CAROL ELIZABETH PEELING 

Teacher College Course 

"Boots" often says "Hey Elinor! 
Hurry up for Pete's sake!" She 
wants to have fun and be a good 
fashion designer or illustrator. That 
explains her hobby of drawing. Carol 
would like to attend Massachusetts 
School of Art after graduating. She 
likes banana splits, Glenn Miller, 
Red Skelton and winter. She hopes 
her good naturedness sets off her 
temper and talking too fast. School 
activities include cast of "Naughty 
Marietta" operetta. Honor Roll, 1 ; 
Senior Play Cast, Dramatic Club, 3; 
Bowling, 3; Archery, 3. 




BETTY LOUISE ORNER 

Business Course 

To be a success as a court reporter 
is "Bets" chief ambition. She often 
says "You're not lying." She likes 
frappes, 9:20 Club, and the movies. 
Her hobbies are bicycle riding and 
horse-back riding. A member of the 
Commercial Club, 3 ; she dislikes con- 
ceited people. Her worst faults are 
eating too much and chewing gum. 



CAROL JOSEPHINE OTTERSON 

"Sugar", whose hobby is enjoying 
herself often says "Hi", and plans 
to go to Emmanuel College. Her ac- 
tivities are Literary Staff of Mirror, 
2 ; Alumni Editor of Mirror, 3 ; Dra- 
matic Club, 1, 2, 3; and Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3. She likes bowling, swim- 
ming, Scituate, Mr. Hodge's apples, 
going up to Potes, and a million 
other things. Her worst faults are 
talking with her hands, and putting 
off until tomorrow what she can 
study today. 



NORMAN EDWARD PATTER- 
SON 

Business Course 

"Since "Pat's" hobby is horse rac- 
ing, his ambition is to own horses 
and race them. Norman likes to be 
with G. Rizzo because they have 
good times together. He dislikes girls 
that talk too much. You will often 
hear him say "Oh! sorry." 



ISABEL LYDIA PAYNE 

Stenographic Course 

"Bel" or "Isy" often says "D'ya 
know what?" She would like to 
travel after the world is settled 
again. Her hobby is collecting toy 
dogs and souvenirs. Worst faults are 
curling up in a chair, and going to 
sieep after being called in the morn- 
ing. 'Isy' dislikes hamburgers, but 
likes Lux Radio Theatre and I Love 
a Mystery. Activities include Dra- 
matic Club, 1939-'40, Commercial 
Club, 1941-'42. 



CARLETON HALL PETERSON 

College Course 

Carleton, also known as "Carl" or 
"Pete", is entering Tufts College in 
June. His ambition is to become a 
dentist. He has been active in the 
band and has been on the honor roll 
every quarter in high school. A mem- 
ber of the Senior Play Cast and 
Senior Play Committee, he admits he 
enjoys Bob Hope. Carleton's pet like 
is flashy ties. 



I 
I 

I 

I 
I 
I 
I 

1 

] 
} 
: 
i 

I! 
II 

I 

1 
1 
1 

! 



-Class of 1942- 



EDGAR H. PETERSON 

Technical Course 

"Pete" coaxes "C'mon, Chevy" and 
tells us that he wants to be a suc- 
cessful man and to attend Annapolis. 
"Pete" as you know, has been in the 
band for two years. He likes any- 
thing good and dislikes anything bad. 
"Pete" is very shy, and would 
rather listen than talk. 



WILLIAM HERBERT PIERCE 

Civic Course 

"Bill" shouted "Get off my ear" 
when asked to elucidate his ambition 
and destination ; however he said they 
were to shoot down 3 Jap planes, and 
to sleep in a bunk at Camp Edwards 
with "Pendy." Keeping "Pendy" 
out of trouble is his virtue, and his 
worst fault is working too much. 
"Bill" likes chicken; he does not like 
girls or cars! 



MARILYN JOAN POTHIER 

College Course 

"Clean my glasses. Marge" and 
"Which way do we go?" are "Mick- 
ey's" favorite expressions. Marilyn 
likes filberts, riding with Marge and 
Bardie to get hamburgs, and tennis. 
She dislikes alarm clocks and onions. 
Her worst faults are chewing gum 
and laughing too much. Sleeping is 
a hobby with "Mickey" and her des- 
tination is Simmons to learn to be- 
come a medical secretary. 



FRANCIS ADELBERT POWERS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Ducky", who is ambitious to play 
the piano with some well-known or- 
chestra, is often heard saluting others 
with "Hi ya, kid." He is ambitious 
to attend the music school at B. U. 
He enjoys playing at dances, but has 
an intense dislike for early rising. 



RICHARD QUINN 
Business Course 




WANDE CAROLYN PETROVICH 

Business Course 

"Wendy", who is always heard 
crying, "OOh, wait for me, Boots", 
wishes to go round the world three 
times (with Boots). Her ambition is 
to become a stenographer for Uncle 
•Sam. Field hockey, basketball and 
baseball (all three years), the Com- 
mercial Club, and the honor roll 1 
and 2 have kept "Wendy" pretty 
busy. She dreams too much, but is 
always sociable. Glenn Miller and 
clam dinners appeal to her, but sober 
girls definitely do not! 



ROBERT JOSEPH POLECHIO 

Technical Course 

"Bob," whose ambition is to make 
a lot of money and retire young, is 
eternally asking "Who's got a 
match 1 ?" His future may consist of 
college or the air corps — and his 
hobby? — automobile engines! "Bob" 
favors night life, but has no love for 
rules or regulations. Hastily done 
homework is "Bob's" weak point; 
generosity, his strong one. 



PATRICIA POWER 

College Course 

"Pat's" favorite expression seems to 
vary between "really" and "no kid- 
ding" and a favorite hobby is eat- 
ing Brigham's sundaes. "Patty" 
hopes to go to Emmanuel College and 
perhaps be a medical secretary on 
graduating from there. She likes new 
clothes, bicycles, plays, Boston, and 
just having fun, but doesn't like 
short boys and not being able to 
wear red. Her activities include : 
Senior Play candy girl, Dramatic 
Club, bowling and archery. 



EDWARD WILLIAM POWERS 

Technical Course 

"Hi cutie" is frequently heard from 
"Puppy," a popular senior whose ac- 
tivities include Senior Nominating 
Sr. Play and Graduation Committees ; 
and Class Day Usher; Football Usher, 
1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2; and Pres- 
ident of the IV B Club. "Puppy's" 
ambition is to travel the Burma Road 
and his destination the Waverley 
Naval Academy. Likes Dean's frap- 
pes. His best virtue is staying in 
nights — we wonder! 



ROSE DOROTHY RANDO 

Practical Arts Course 

Rose hopes to be a dressmaker 
some day, but right now she collects 
movie magazines. Her ambition is to 
go West and live the life of a cow 
girl. Her favorite expression is 
"Hey, Babe" and she likes to listen 
to the Lux Radio Theatre and the 
9 :20 Club. Oral compositions are 
her pet dislike and chewing gum is 
her worst fault. Getting along with 
everyone is her best virtue. 



IIMIIMIIMf |O.SS Oi I 04-2"*'"'^ <> '^"''^"'^" < ^ , '^' V ^"^*' >— »"^»'>«»'>^»"^» , < 



MIRIAM ELIZABETH RARDIN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Blondie" collects bracelets as a 
hobby and often says "Hi, Maizie". 
She likes to receive letters and to 
listen to "Maudie's Diary" and 
"Meet Your Navy." She dislikes be- 
ing called "Blondie". Miriam's am- 
bition is to follow the fleet. G<«-d 
luck, Miriam. She may attend Wil- 
fred Academy next year. 



THORNTON NELSON REGAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Plop's" ambition is undecided, but 
keeping busy is his hobby. He likes 
sports, steak, French fries, and Glenn 
Miller, and says that not going to 
bed nights is his worst fault. "Plop" 
often says "Don't ask me". He dis- 
likes girls that "act" continuously. 
His activities include Sophomore 
Nominating Committee, Junior and 
Senior Class Auditor, Art Editor of 
the Mirror, 1941-'42, Honor Roll, 
Class day usher. Most of all "Plop" 
likes to make friends and his person- 
ality wins every one. 



ROBERT WILLIAM RITCHIE 

Civic Course 

"Bob" likes to sit in on a card 
game and "heckle" and is often heard 
saying "Wait up, Mac." His hob- 
bies are cartooning and playing the 
jute box. His ambition is to get into 
Civil Service and also to help 
National Defense. With the excep- 
tion of Mae West, "Bob" dislikes 
actresses but he likes Glenn Miller's 
band and dancing "awfully much." 
Forever eating is his virtue and his 
activities include W. H. S. band. 
Underground Club and school sports. 



EMILIE SUZANNE ROCHE 

Special Course 

Emilie wants to be a nurse and 
spend her money for clothes. Her 
hobby is saving her mail and she 
likes to call her friends and talk for 
hours. You'll often hear her ex- 
claim, "He's not bad". Her worst 
fault is "teasing Johnny". Emilie 
is a member of the Glee Club. 



JOHN J. RUSSO 

Business Course 

"Sorry" and "Yeah, I know" are 
Johnny's stock phrases. He especially 
likes to go to the movies with a cer- 
tain person. He wants to become a 
big business man and travel around 
the world. Johnny dislikes snobbish 
people and says that his worst fault 
is sleeping. His hobby is driving 
and his best virtue is taking long 
walks. He is treasurer of the Com- 
mercial Club. 




MARTHA LOUISE RICHARDSON 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dicky" likes to listen to the Hit 
Parade and the Ford Sunday Evening 
Hour. Her ambition is to become a 
nurse. She often says "O, my gosh". 
She likes to roller skate, and to eat 
fried clams. Glamor girls and oral 
compositions are "Dicky's" pet dis- 
likes. She likes to sing and wants to 
go to England some day. Her best 
virtue is being on time. 



MARION ELAINE RINGROSE 

Business Course 

"Dang it" says "Katish", who likes 
to dance and listen to Baby Snooks 
and the 9:20 Club. She wants to be- 
come a good secretary and then travel 
in the United States. Her hobby is 
collecting souvenirs and her worst 
faults are being forgetful and talk- 
ing with her hands. She is a mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club and the 
Dramatic Club. 



C. GERLANDO RIZZO 

Business Course 

"Gege" often says "Never mind". 
He wants to be an executive and go 
traveling. His hobby is football and 
he has been manager of football for 
three years. His favorite radio pro- 
gram is Bob Hope and his worst 
fault is spending too much money. 



NEWTON WHITMAN RUGGLES 

College Course 

"For a safe, comfortable, fast, 
trip take the train!" says "Choo 
Choo" Ruggles. He admits that he 
and "you dope" a 
but his best virtue 
most of the time, 
that by looking at 
listening to Phyl 



says "Shut up" 
little too often 
is being happy 
Anyone can see 
him. He dislikes 

Cronin arguing with teachers, but he 
enjoys watching Mr. Ward act and 
imitate people. His hobbies include 
model railroading, reading train mag- 
azines, and just trains! "Newt" 
turns actor for the Senior play but 
he wants to become an engineer and 
hopes to enter Northeastern. 

DONALD FRANCIS RYAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Pat's" ambition is to join the U. 
S. Navy and his destination is the 
U. S. Naval Air Corps. He likes 
Bob Hope's program and all sports. 
His best virtue is being able to 
meet new people easily. Figure draw- 
ing is his hobby and he has been a 
member of the W. H. S. Band for 
three years. He says his worst fault 
is his bad temper but he always 
looks happy to us. He was in 
"Naughty Marietta" in 1941. 



-Class of 1942- — — — — _._<>_,_,_.> 



MARGARET F. RYAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Don't get pouty" is "Peggy's" 
stock phrase. She likes banana splits 
and movies. Her hobby is collecting 
photographs and her favorite radio 
programs are Bob Hope and Lux 
Radio Theatre. Although her destina- 
tion is undecided, "Peg" wants to ob- 
tain a good position after graduation. 
When the hockey team loses, "Peg's" 
best virtue is paying off her bets and 
her worst fault is unconsciously giv- 
ing "dirty" looks. 



VIRGINIA LOUISE SAVAGE 

To see all of the United States is 
"Gini's" ambition. Her destination 
is Boston University and to become 
a teacher. Her worst faults are 
catching colds and talking over old 
times with V. C. T. in French. She 
likes the Waltham Spa and Democ- 
racy class. Dislikes having too much 
homework but likes vanilla cokes. 
Says her best virtue is doing her 
homework although she puts a ques- 
tion mark after this statement. 



JOSEPH JAMES SCICHILONE 

Civic Course 

"Chickie's" destination is to be- 
come a radio operator in the Coast 
Guard. Favorite expression is "Don't 
be foolish. Take it." He dislikes 
afternoon sessions and says his worst 
fault is fooling with "Red". Likes 
Superman and art classes. Says that 
his special mannerism is "I didn't do 
it, Miss Allen." Best virtue is that 
he is always laughing. 



ROBERT SEGIEN 

Practical Arts Course 

Seems to have many nicknames 
among which are "Butch," "Big 
Butch," "Alexander,," and "Big 
Chief." He intends to be a boiler 
welder during the summer and go to 
Texas University in the fall. His 
ambition is to join the Marines as a 
second lieutenant. Dislikes people 
who do their homework on time. 
Likes A's on test papers. Hobbies 
are sleeping, eating, and shooting. 



MARJORIE E. SELIG 

Nicknames are "Midge" and "Mar- 
gie". Her destination is the Leland 
Power Dramatic School and her am- 
bition is to become an actress which 
should be easy for a girl with her 
personality. Her hobby is keeping 
out of trouble which is very admir- 
able. Likes fried potatoes and hock- 
ey games. Dislikes ra-ras and stub- 
born people. Says she herself is 
stubborn which is hard to believe of 
"Marge". 




GERALDINE SALTER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jerry's" ambition is to be a suc- 
cess, which is a very admirable one. 
Her destination is to get a job. She 
likes to read and to dance, and dis- 
likes waiting for people. Thinks her 
best virtue is patience and worst 
fault is biting her nails.- Her fa- 
vorite program is the Inner Sanctum. 



JAMES JOSEPH SCAFIDI 

Stenographic Course 

"Scaf's" ambition is to join the 
navy,- but he would like to do any- 
thing that would bring him a salary. 
Enjoys playing basketball, billiards, 
and bowling. Dislikes grouchy peo- 
ple as don't we all. Says he is a 
faithful rooter of the Waltham 
sports teams, and that his worst 
fault is arguing. 



GEORGE ANTON SEDERQUIST 

College Course 

Smiling is "Sedy's" best virtue, he 
says. Likes to say "You're full of 
balloon juice." Destination is Colby 
but his ambition is to become an un- 
dertaker. His activies include the 
Band, 2, 3, 4 ; football, 2, 3; operetta, 
3 ; bowling, 2. He should be a very 
easy person to get along with since 
he likes everything but pickles. 
Claims his worst fault is loaning 
money to Barnicle. 



HILDA DOROTHY SELIG 

Business Course 

"Cowgirl" would like to lead a 
cowboy band and travel out west be- 
fore she dies. Says "Could be!" 
very frequently. Likes Gene Autry 
and traveling, and any cowboy pro- 
gram. Says her worst fault is hav- 
ing "L." buy a chocolate soda "if&lf 
her and never finishing it, but hopes' 
she will some day. Activities include 
Commercial Club, Dramatic Club, 
and Honor Roll. 



LEVON T. SEXTON 

Business Course 

"Sam's" favorite expression is 
"You're crazy". His ambition is to 
write and be a millionaire at 35. 
Likes Glenn Miller and Vic Arden's 
music. Dislikes camouflaged girls. 
Says his worst fault is annoying 
people and his best virtue is help- 
ing a friend in trouble. His special 
mannerism is feeling his pockets. 
Hobbies are stamp collecting and 
playing tennis. 



■Class of 1942- 



RALPH EUGENE SHEPHERD 

Rusiness Course 

Nicknames are "Shepp" and 
"Sheepy". Ambition is to join the 
navy or become a business machines 
repairman. Dislikes school. Likes to 
travel, ski, "Sherlock Holmes," and 
Lana Turner. Says his worst fault 
is forgetting where he goes next 
period. Hobbies are the accordion 
and harmonica. 



MYRTIS ETHELDA SIMMONS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Myrtie" or "Simmy" expects to 
train to be a nurse or a dietician. 
Her ambition is to do mathematics 
with gusto. Likes fudge sundaes and 
Chopin's Nocturnes. Dislikes cold 
roast pork, bright jewelry, and boogy- 
woogy. Favorite radio programs are 
Information Please and The rimer 
Sanctum. 



EDWARD JAMES SMITH 

Rusiness Course 

Nickname is "E. J." Destination 
is to join the army, navy, or marines. 
Worst fault is borrowing nickles and 
best virtue is paying them back. 
Ambition is to command a ship. Hob- 
by is collecting stamps. 



SHIRLEY F. SMITH, JR. 

Civic Course 

"Snuffy's" destination is to work 
for the Edison Co. as a lineman. 
Ambition is to succeed. Hobby is 
foxhunting. Likes to listen to Rob 
Hope, Jack Benny, and I Love a 
Mystery. Worst fault is missing 
foxes and trying to sing "Rose 
O'Day." 



FRANCIS HENRY SQUIRES 

Business Course 

Nickname is "Fran". Ambition is 
to make some of the "big money" 
people are talking about. He is a 
member of the Commercial Club. 
Likes the 9:20 Club, Bob Hope, to 
drive cars, to sleep, and to eat. 




ANNE A. SHIELDS 

Special Course 

"Sis's" favorite expression is "Good 
job!" Her destination is a business 
school or the Waltham Training 
School for nurses. Worst fault is 
imitating a certain French woman. 
Favorite radio programs are Glenn 
Miller and Lux Radio Theatre. Her 
ambition is to be successful and her 
hobby is collecting snapshots. 



MARION I. SMALL 

Business Course 

Destination is to get a job and a 
husband. Says she has no ambition, 
would rather sleep. Likes 9:20 Club 
and hockey games. Worst fault is 
losing things. Best virtue is patience. 
Likes to gossip and to eat apple pie 
and ice cream. Dislikes doing dishes. 
Hobby is collecting snapshots. 



ANN LOUISE SMITH 

Ann is in the Practical Arts Course, 
and her favorite expression is "Easy 
does it." Her ambition is to be suc- 
cessful in whatever field she chooses. 
Reading Grace Hill's books is her 
hobby. Ann's destination is to go to 
the Providence Bible Institution. Her 
pet like is bowling, while her pet 
dislike is gushy people. Her favorite 
radio program is "I Love a Mystery." 
Her worst fault is the love of study- 
ing ; her best virtue is being on time. 



HELEN J. SOZANSKI 

Business Course 

"Suzie's" hobby is dancing the 
polka. She would like to become a 
buyer of sports clothes after she takes 
a trip to Chicago with Mil. Likes 
friendly people. Faults are talking too 
fast and too often. Virtue is seeing 
something good in everyone. Dislikes 
the nickname "Suzie" and fried clams. 
Activities include the Commercial 
Club and the Honor Roll. 



AUSTIN STARR, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Aus" would like to have a travel 
bureau after going to college. Likes 
lots of food and sports. Worst fault 
is betting with F. Murphy and F. 
Dougherty. Best virtue is eating all 
the time. Activities include Junior 
Prom Committee ; basketball, 2 ; usher 
at Class-Day ^nd Graduation; Senior 
Play Committed and member of the 
Underground Club. 



Class of 1942- 



MYLES PATRICK SWEENEY, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

Nickname is "Smiles". Destination 
is to be a boiler welder for the sum- 
mer and join the Marines in the fall. 
Hobbies are reading and dancing. 
Activities include the Underground 
Club, ping pong, horseback riding, 
and swimming. Likes tuna fish and 
banana royals. Dislikes certain girls, 
especially blondes. 



ANGELO ALBERT TARANTO 

Technical Course 

"Sonny" yells, "Who dropped some- 
thing" when enjoying his hobby, 
which is eating. His ambitious fu- 
ture consists of joining the United 
States Air Corps and attending 
Northeastern. "Sonny" likes the Lone 
Ranger, painting, and looking at 
blondes. But to sit down and con- 
centrate — never! 



JACQUELINE GLORIA TET- 
REAULT 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jackie" with a whooping "Rowdy- 
dow" states that she likes singing 
with a concert orchestra. Collecting 
crazy souvenirs is her hobby. She 
abhors being kept waiting, but danc- 
ing and pretzles are a pleasant di- 
version from her everyday occupations. 



ETHEL MAE STAVES 

Business Course 

Destination is to get a job as a 
stenographer. Ambition is to be able 
to travel all over America. Hobby 
is horseback riding. Member of Com- 
mercial Club. Best virtue is being 
on time. Likes sundaes and driving 
a car. Dislikes people who are al- 
ways late. Claims her worst fault is 
forming an opinion of a person on 
first sight. 



CHARLES RICHARD STEWART, 
JR. 

Civic Course 

"Chic" would like to go to North- 
eastern and then travel and make 
people happy. Hobbies are collect- 
ing score cards and pretty girls. 
Likes Glenn Miller, Tommy Dorsey, 
Sammy Kaye, and Kay Kyser. Best 
virtue is being easy to get along with. 
Says he can make friends with any- 
one. Likes to travel and say "Keep 
cool." 




WALTER L. SYKES 

Accounting Course 

"Kinky" tells us his nickname in 
shame. Favorite expression is "Why?" 
Destination is to get into defense 
work and then get some more edu- 
cation. Ambition is to become an 
executive. Dislikes homework. Says 
that he is not bashful and dislikes 
people who are. Hobbies are sailing, 
boating, and skiing. 



MARY MADELINE TERRANO 

Business Course 

"Curly" hopes to become a secretary 
and be successful in the business 
world. The Commercial Club has 
been her source of activity for this 
year. She likes Lux Theatre, singing, 
and drawing, but jazz is an ugly- 
duckling in her opinion. She has an 
intense dislike for being disturbed 
when busy. 



EDWIN D. THOMAS, JR. 

Technical Course 

"Eddie" is well-known in sports, 
as we all know, and is often heard 
expressing himself by saying, "I'll 
belt ya". Northeastern is his desti- 
nation. J. V. and Varsity football 
and hockey 3 years, Sophomore Nom- 
inating Committee, Chairman, Junior 
Nominating Committee, Senior Dance 
Committee and Junior Class Vice- 
president have kept Eddie busy. He 
likes good food, but dislikes getting 
up at 7:00 A. M. He just can't mind 
his own business. 



BARBARA M. STENSTROM 

Business Course 

Nicknames are "Baby" or "Babs". 
Destination is to go to New River, 
North Carolina. Ambition is to be 
a good secretary. Activities include 
the Literary Staff of the Mirror. Dra- 
matic Club, Commercial Club, Honor 
Roll, 1940-'41, Senior Play Committee. 
Worst fault is lending money. Dis- 
likes to waken Lil H. from a sound 
sleep when she calls for her to go 
to school. Likes skating, tennis, eat- 
ing pie, to take walks. Best virtue 
is being on time. 



FRANCES SULLIVAN 

Teachers' College Course 

"Fran's" favorite expression is 
"Swel'1-1-1-1 ! " Destination is the 
Cambridge Hospital Training School 
and her ambition is to become an 
air hostess. Likes people with good 
dispositions. Dislikes rainy weather 
and getting up in the morning. Worst 
faults are not cleaning out her locker 
and not paying back nickels to Ann. 
Best virtue is doing her chemistry 
experiments. Activities include bas- 
ketball, archery, and bowling. 



■Class of 1942- 



MILDRED GRACE THOMAS 

Business Course 

"Millie" quietly says "Gee Whiz" 
when asked about her ambition which, 
we found out, is to take a trip to 
Indiana. Her destination is the tel- 
ephone exchange as an operator. Be- 
longing to the Commercial Club and 
eating whoopie pies keep Millie busy. 
But snobbish girls — well-11-11! As 
for being on time — that's her virtue. 



ANGELINA MARIE TOMAO 

Business Course 

"Angie" was saying, "Aw, you're 
fooling!" She wishes to travel, pref- 
erably by plane, as a hostess. The 
Commercial Club, Glenn Miller, Lux 
Radio Theatre, Bob Hope, and Jack 
Benny are 1-A with "Angie". She is 
full of impatience but she is willing 
to help those who really need it. 



JANE EILEEN TURNER 

College Course 

"Terry's" ambition is to literally 
"raise the roof" and often exasper- 
atingly questions "What's the formu- 
la for it?" Her destination is the 
University of Maine. She has been 
occupied by the band and orchestra, 

1, 2, 3; basketball, 1; hondr roll, 1, 

2, 3. Her virtue is lending lunch 
money to C. P. As for curly hair — 
um-m-m ! 



THELMA H. UHLIN 

Business Course 

"Thel" says she wants to go to 
work and be a success. Her favor- 
ite expression is "I'm starved", and 
she states that her pet like is tuna 
fish sandwiches. Thelma dislikes con- 
ceited people. We can understand 
that for her best virtue is being con- 
genial. You can depend on "Thel's" 
being beside the radio when Glenn 
Miller or The Inner Sanctum is on. 
She chews gum and plays with her 
eye glasses maybe a little too often. 
Dancing is her hobby. "Thel" is a 
member of the Commercial Club. 

ANITA T. VALLIERE 

Business Course 

"Pete" likes long telephone conver- 
sations, fried chicken, and the 9:20 
Club. Her hobbies are sleeping, 
bowling, and dancing. Anita's desti- 
nation is any factory and her ambi- 
tion is to see into the future. Her 
favorite expression is "Good luck to 
you." Being interrupted and hypo- 
crites are her dislikes. "Pete's" worst 
fault is being late, while being calm 
in catastrophes is her best virtue. 
Sleeping in school is just a manner- 
ism. She is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club. 




ARTHUR EASTMAN THURS- 
TON, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Art" is always yelling, "When do 
we eat?" Being a radioman on a 
costal tanker in the Merchant Ma- 
rine Radio School is something to 
look forward to. He likes food and 
people with a sunny disposition but 
steers around stuck-up people. His 
most embarrassing fault is blushing, 
Lut Iiis best virtue is his disposition. 



DONALD O. TOWER 

"Ducky," says "Pardon me, chum" 
enthusiastically, as he states his 
modest ambition — $50 per week and 
becoming an executive as destinatibn. 
"Ducky" is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club. He likes hockey, fodd, 
and jives. But those fussy customers 
— yowee! 



VIRGINIA CLEAVELAND TUT- 

TLE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Gini's ambition is to travel around 
the world. To earn enough money 
she plans to become a nurse, and jerk 
sodas on the side. Her pet vanity is 
caring for her hair. Being honest is 
her best trait. She was in the Senior 
Play. 



MARY LORETTA VAHEY 

Practical Arts Course 

Mary's ambition is to be a nurse. 
Her favorite expression is "I'm com- 
ing Jackie" while her pet dislike is 
hearing Jackie call, "Hurry up." Col- 
lecting money is Mary's hobby. Her 
worst fault is being slow and her 
best virtue is being sociable. Jack 
Benny is Mary's favorite radio pro- 
gram. Her activities are basketball, 
3 and honor roll, 2, 3. 



GEORGE LOUIS VENO 

Practical Arts Course 

"Big George" or "Wadsworth" says 
his favorite expressions are "Oh, you 
big handsome brute" and 'And they 
hang wallpaper". His destination is 
to go down Texas with "Jungle", 
"Butch", "Midge", and "Adolf", or 
to join the U. S. Marines as Segien's 
valet. His pet like is playing golf. 
The 9:20 Club, Bob Hope and Ran- 
som Sherman, are his favorite radio 
programs. His best virtue is holding 
the lantern while his mother chops 
the wood. Wow ! He is assistant 
secretary of the cooking team. 



•Class of 1942 



ANNIE THERESA VIOLANTI 

Business Course 

"Ann" or "Shorty" wants to be an 
accountant and to travel. Her hob- 
bies are going to the movies and lis- 
tening to the radio. She is always 
saying, "Oh! Gosh" and "What 1 ?" 
"Ann" likes Barry Wood's singing 
and detective books. She dislikes pep- 
pers, and people telling her to get 
off her knees. Barry Wood, Lux Ra- 
dio, and The Hit Parade are her fa- 
vorite radio programs. Being too 
quiet is her worst fault while being 
on time is her best virtue. 'Shorty" 
is a member of the Commercial Club. 



RICHARD STEELE WALKER 

Business Course 

"Dick's" favorite expression is "Oh, 
yea" and his ambition is to be a 
successful business man. His likes 
include fooling with electricity, Bob 
Hope, and plain chocolate. He dis- 
likes these "never ending" radio se- 
rials and says his worst fault is talk- 
ing too much. He wants to go to 
Business School next fall. 



MARGARET MARY WALSH 

"Magee's" ambition is to be a rich 
man's private secretary. She likes to 
collect letters and her favorite radio 
programs are Bob Hope and Red 
Skelton. Her activities are Mirror 
Room Agent, 1 ; Nominating Com- 
mittee, 1 ; Volley Ball, 1 ; Baseball, 
1; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. She says 
her worst fault is getting to school 
just as the five-minutes-of-bell rings. 
Her best virtue is not talking in 
Miss Callanan's room. 



RICHARD J. WALSH 

Business Course 

"Hi, there" is "Dick's" favorite 
expression. He is a Commercial 
Club member. He wants to be a 
Certified Public Accountant and is 
going to attend a business college. 
His favorite radio programs are "Au- 
dition of the Air" and Jack Benny 
and he also likes horses, automobiles, 
and a good movie with nice company. 
He dislikes busses and drivers, his 
worst fault being that he doesn't 
have a car that runs. 



JEANNE JOY WEBSTER 

College Course 

"Jeanie" likes to say "mm!" To 
have oodles of spare time some day 
is her ambition. Sophomore Social, 
Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; Bowling, 3; 
Archery, 1, 2; and Literary Com- 
mittee are her activities. "Web's" 
worst fault is copying algebra home- 
work and her best virtue is not get- 
ting angry when she should. She 
dislikes shirts without ties, and be- 
ing told to hurry, but her pet likes 
are bolsters, movies on Friday after- 
noons, and going to "H. H.?" 
meetings. 




MARVIN DAVID WALDMAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Marv" or "Waldie" as he is of- 
ten called is always saying "take it 
slow". Since he wants to be a chem- 
ist in a Pharmaceutical House he ex- 
pects to attend Mass. College of 
Pharmacy. He is another 9 :20 Club 
fan and Vaughn Monroe, Les Brown, 
and Glenn Miller are favorites, 
Photography and Record collecting 
are his hobbies. He likes driving au- 
tomobiles but dislikes girls that talk 
too much. He says his worst fault is 
needing a shave most of the time. 



CHARLES F. WALSH 

Practical Arts Course 

"Bud" has two ambitions: to be 
successful in the business world and 
bowl 110. His favorite expression is 
! 'yeah" and his hobbies are horseback 
riding, reading, and skiing. His fa- 
vorite food is spaghetti and he also 
likes winter sports and Room 216 
girls. He says his worst fault is' be- 
ing late. Burdett's Business School 
is his destination. 



RICHARD CHARLES WALSH . r 

Business Course ;1 ... •■ 

"Dick" is always: saying "H'ya 
Bud" and "How's, tricks". His des- 
tination is , th? Watch Factory. . To 
run a mile .iij 4 minutes is his am- 
bition. His hobby is listening to the 
radio and he .'also likes sports pro- 
grams, summer vacations and the Ink- 
spots. He dislikes homework. His 
worst fault is not remembering 
names. 



DAVID HERBERT WANBERG 

Technical Course 

"Dave" or "Pussyfoot" as he also 
is called, often says "mmm-could be". 
His ambitions include becoming a 
research chemist and a cadet in the 
U. S. Coast Guard Academy. I Love 
a Mystery and The Lone Ranger are 
his favorite programs. "Dave" likes 
sports, and Swedes but he dislikes 
girls in slacks. Laziness is his worst 
fault, tender-heartedness his best vir- 
tue, and his long stride is a special 
mannerism. His activities include 
track, 2; Chem. Laboratory Asst., 2, 
3; IV B Club, 3. 



LILLIAN HARRIET WHELPLEY 

College Course 

"Happy Day" is Lillian's favorite 
expression and her ambition is to 
graduate from Boston University and 
get a good position. Her special ac- 
tivities are orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Assem- 
bly pianist, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 3; 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. Her pet likes 
are good music, swimming, skating, 
and the State of Maine. Her best 
virtue is modesty. Her hobbies in- 
clude drawing, and collecting post- 
cards. 






FRANCES DRAPER WHITCOMB 

College Course 

"Fran", whose ambition is to travel, 
often says "Hi!" or "I don't care!" 
Her activities are Nominating Com- 
mittee, 2 ; Senior Play Committee, 
Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 
3 ; Dramatic Club, 3 ; Literary Staff 
of the Mirror, 2; and Basketball, 1. 
Patience is her virtue and not talk- 
ing enough is her worst fault. She 
likes dancing, semi-classical music 
and "Che-Zo's". Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege is Frannie's" destination. 



OLIVE MARIE WOODBURY 

Stenographic Course 

"Ollie" likes Glenn Miller and 
the Inner Sanctum, while her hobby 
is collecting statues of horses. She 
expects to be a stenographer, but 
hopes to be a private secretary. Her 
activities include bowling, 1, 2, 3; 
Commercial Club, 3; baseball, 1. 
Blushing is her worst fault, and she 
often says "Tain't funny Magee". 



ERNEST JOSEPH YAMARTINO 

Technical Course 

"Ernie" or "Yamie" loves to say 
"Where's my homework?" He wants 
to go to college and be an aeronau- 
tical engineer. His activities were 
President of IV B Club, Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3; Senior Play Committee. 
Funny books and Red Skelton's pro- 
gram are favorites of his. He dis- 
likes being disturbed when concentrat- 
ing and his worst fault is acting 
silly. 




CLIFFORD KEATON WHITE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Whizzer", whose hobby is making 
model airplanes, often says "Hi ya 
all!" He plans to join the Army 
Air Corps for active duty as a cadet 
and then to get a commission as a 
second lieutenant, although he hopes 
to be a 1st lieutenant some day. He 
likes Glenn Miller, Alvins Rey, and 
a certain young lady, while he dis- 
likes symphony music and lending 
pencils. He sleeps too much, but 
is usually on time. 



PHYLLIS ANN WORRELL 

College Course 

"Phyl" or "Bunny" often says 
"Jeepers" or " No Kidding", and 
she makes friends easily. She hopes 
to go to Radcliffe and to be a suc- 
cess in whatever she does. Her ac- 
tivities in High School have been, 
Literary Staff of Mirror, 1940-'41 ; 
Junior Nominating Committee, Senior 
Play Committee, Dramatic Club, 2, 
3; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; Soph. Social 
Committee, and some sports. She 
likes hot fudge sundaes, Lux Radio 
Theatre, Inner Sanctum and dancing, 
and dislikes soft-boiled eggs and 
rainy days. 



DOROTHY ELLEN ZIMAN 

Business Course 

"Dot" who wants to become a 
farmer's wife often says "It's a 
shame". She takes part in all kinds 
of sports including horseback riding 
and skiing, and she likes to drive a 
tractor and listen to Glenn Miller's 
music. Her sunny disposition covers 
up her fault of talking too much, 
and she is often caught day dream- 
ing. She has been a member of the 
Commercial Club and on the Honor 
Roll for 3 years. 



VIRGINIA BARBARA ZACAME 

Business Course 

"Oh, Sugar!" is "Ginny's" favor- 
ite expression. She likes to meet 
new people and hopes to become a 
good private secretary. Much of her 
time is spent bowling, roller skating, 
dancing and listening to Bob Hope. 
She enjoys buying clothes and eating 
chocolate bars, but she dislikes tall 
boys and red hair. She also likes 
to meet new people. During High 
School she has been in the Commer- 
cial Club, and on the Honor Roll in 
her second year. 



-Class of 1942 



■ iOiiO"«M» 



ROBERT WHITFIELD ADAMS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Sparky" is often seen scratching 
his head and yelping "Hey, Bub!" 
Playing hockey with the Bruins after 
attending the University of New 
Hampshire will do for a future. 
Hockey 1, 2, 3; baseball and foot- 
ball 1 terminate his scholastic attain- 
ments. Skating, Glenn Miller and 
Fred Waring get his nod of approval 
but noisy girls are taboo ! Borrow- 
ing money is his fault, attempting to 
convince Nickerson he's good is 
"Sparky's" virtue. 



CARL CARLSON 

Civic Course 

"Swede," "Whity," or "Curly" are 
his nicknames. He hopes to join the 
navy. "How do" and "That's no lie" 
are "Swede's" favorite expressions. 
His hobby is sports. Hanging around 
with Bob Gillis is his worst fault. 
"Swede" likes the 9:20 Club and 
sleeping in study periods. His fa- 
vorite sports are Basketball, Baseball, 
and Hockey. He dislikes getting up 
in the morning, and working. 



FLOYD WILLARD BLAISDELL 

Business Course 

Have you heard that new profes- 
sional drummer yet? He is none 
other than 'Frosty," the young man 
who formerly worked in the Watch 
Factory and had his ears tuned to the 
9:20 Club. Among his favorites are 
Glenn Miller, Vaughn Munroe, Lionel 
Hampton, and Lux Radio Theatre. 



HELEN OASEY 

College Course 

"Yipe" is Helen's favorite expres- 
sion. To own an airplane is her am- 
bition. Her hobbies are traveling 
and airplanes. Medical work is 
Helen's destination. She dislikes cats, 
school, French, and math, but she 
does like dogs, ice cream, and planes. 
Her temper and her impatience are 
Helen's worst faults. Being out- 
spoken is her best virtue. 



BETTY BOOTH 

Practical Arts Course 

Betty often greets her friends with 
"How's your B. U?" Reading keeps 
Betty busy although she spends time 
caring for her nails, which at one 
time were very little. Like most 
people she'd like a good j»b after 
graduation. Fluffy angora sweaters 
and socks are her special likes, while 
getting Mary's lunch is the only 
thing which takes Betty away from 
her calm, cool and collected disposi- 
tion. Although she considers hanging 
around with Mary her worst fault, 
you'll always see them together. 



WINIFRED JULIE BYRNE 

Practical Arts Course 

Did you hear that the grand new 
restaurant owner left to be married? 
This "Win-some- Winnie" loves skat- 
ing, tennis, dancing and the movies. 
Stubborness is her worst fault and 
onions her chief dislike. 



DORIS ELIZABETH CAIN 

Special Course 

"Pet's" favorite expression is "Oh, 
gruesome!" She hopes to follow nurs- 
ing and enter training soon. Her 
hobby is collecting Harry_ James' rec- 
ords. Being called "Red" or "Sugar" 
is entirely to Pet's disliking. She 
enjoys listening to Club Matinee. 
Combing her hair at the most pe- 
culiar times is her worst fault. 
"Pet's" "special mannerism is talking 
continually with her hands. 



FRANCIS CONNEANY 

Civics Course 

"Fran's" ambition is to be a big 
league catcher and his destination is 
Bull Doiran's Baseball school for 
flat-footed Rookies. 



FRANK J. CURLEY 

Civic Course 

"Bud" wants to be a millionaire. 
Who doesn't? His hobby is doing 
homework. "Bud" would like to 
visit Java and other Pacific Islands. 
He is no diffettSl< from other boys 
in that he likes Lana Turner. He 
dislikes getting up in the morning. 



JOHN JOSEPH DEVANE 

Stenographic Course 

You will often hear "Johnny" say- 
ing "what" although he dislikes in- 
quisitive people. "Johnny's" worst 
fault is sleeping too late and his 
best virtue is quietness. He likes ice 
cream and hopes to be a sailor in 
the U. S. Navy after high school. 
Captain Flagg and Sgt. Quirt is his 
favorite radio program. He was on 
the Nominating Committee in his 
sophomore year. 



NEAL E. CANE 

Civic Course 

"Hello, there" is Neal's favorite 
expression. His ambition is to be a 
draftsman. After working a year at 
welding, he wants to go to night 
school. Skating appeals to him more 
than anything else. He says it is 
the one thing he can do well. He 
dislikes people who are apparently in 
love with themselves. Staying up late' 
at night is his worst fault. 



ROBERT EMMETT DOIRON 

Civic Course 

Likes mocha frappes, but dislikes 
would be glamour girls. His hobby 
is losing dimes to "Punchy" Dion. 
"Yi, Ya, Chump, "Zip-Zip" and 
"Beautiful" are "Gus's" favorite ex- 
pressions. He's undecided as to what 
his worst fault is, but he claims he 
has too many good virtues to list. 
His favorite radio program is Glenn 
Miller. To enlist in the U. S. Naval 
Reserve is his destination. 



Class of 1942 



RICHARD LeBLANC 

Practical Arts Curse 

"Dick's" ambition is to become a 
deep-sea diver, but he loudly pro- 
claims that he is not all wet. His 
pet likes are playing the cornet, col- 
lecting jazz records, corny jokes and 
getting home early are his pet peeves. 
He played two years of football. 



HELEN MARIE GARDINER 

Business Course 

Helen is a business girl and wants 
to become a buyer for a chain of 
stores. Her favorite expression is 
"Jeepers Creepers" and she likes the 
cafeteria's tuna sandwiches. Helen's 
hobby is reading and Mr. Hood's oral 
themes is her pet dislike. Being late 
is her worst fault. She is a member 
of the Commercial Club and of the 
Dramatic Club. 



ANGELINA ROSE MANERO 

Business Course 

Music, dancing, skating, and Inner 
Sanctum constitute "Shorty's" likes. 
Favorite expression is "Oh, sugar." 
Her hobby is singing and her ambi- 
tion is to travel. Belongs to the 
Glee Club and Commercial Club. 
Worst fault is blushing, and best 
virtue is lending money. 



JOHN J. HAND 

Practical Arts Course 

"Hep" wants to get a good job in 
the work he will want. His favorite 
expression is "No kidding!" He 
likes the 9:20 Club, Bob Hope and 
dislikes fussy, bossy people. 



FRED ARTHUR MILAN 

College Course 

Fred, an anti-social socialist would 
rather ski than eat, but eating comes 
a close second. He is heading for 
U. of New Hampshire and electrical 
engineering, but meanwhile spends his 
time skiing and being an amateur 
radio ham. This Senior Play Com- 
mittee member wants to be "smart 
like Bing" and often inquires, "Done 
your German?" 



ANASTASIA KATHLEEN 
MILLER 

Practical Arts Course 

Anastasia has the ambition to go 
to California in her own car. She 
answers to the names of "Stasia", 
"Zeke", or "Fuzzy". All sports are 
her hobby, but her destination is 
nursing. She admits that she dislikes 
homework, but don't censure her for 
that! 



NORMA FRANCES HAPENNY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Shrimp's" best virtue is her pa- 
tience. She wants to become a hair- 
dresser and go to Wilfred Academy. 
Likes roller skating, shows, and 
clothes. Frequently says "Hi kid!" 



DAVID WARNER JONES 

Civic Course 

"Jonesy" wants to travel around 
the world, join the Navy or Marines, 
or become a cartoonist. He often 
says "Who - me?" and spends much 
time drawing. He thrives on lemon 
meringue pies, and listens to the 9 :20 
Club a lot. His nickname does not 
please him. 



LEONICE MAY KELLY 

Accounting Course 

"Leonie's" commendable ambition is 
to be a success in everything she un- 
dertakes. She loves sports, dancing, 
and people in general. She was book- 
keeper for the cafeteria and belongs 
to the Commercial Club. 



ROBERT LOUIS NEWTON 

Civic Course 

"Why does it always happen to 
me?" says "Bo Bo" when anything 
goes wrong. He expects to go to sea 
and in time to become a marine 
engineer. Manhattan Merry Go- 
Round, Bugle Plantation Party and 
work are his favorite likes. Carpen- 
try work and building are his hob- 
bies. Chewing gum is his worst fault 
and willingness to work his best 
virtue. 



WALTER GRAHAM PAGE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Wally" enjoys tinkering with ra- 
dios. His ambition is to be a me- 
chanic in the army air corps. You'll 
often hear "Wally" say, "That ain't 
no lie." He confesses his worst fault 
is not doing homework. School ac- 
tivities include Senior Play. 



Class of 1942™ 




FRANCIS PAUL PENDERGAST 

Civic Course 

When you hear someone saying 
"Where ya goin' " you will know 
its "Pendy." His ambition is to shoot 
down three Jap planes. Camp Ed- 
wards with Pierce is his destination. 
Likes milk shakes and Glenn Miller 
but doesn't like getting up in the 
morning. Activities include Football, 
1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; Track, 
1, 2, 3. 



JOSEPH STROUM 

Practical Arts Course 

"Joe" or "Hum" would like to go 
for a week without borrowing money. 
Likes to hear Sethy whisper in the 
Embassy and to kid Nicky about his 
dream girl. Dislikes the advertise- 
ment of Virginia Dare on the 9:20 
Club. Best virtue is listening to 
Seth rave about baseball and Nicky 
about his dreamy thing. Activities in- 
clude baseball, 1, 2, 3; basketball, 1, 
2, 3 ; Underground Club. Hobby is 
sports. 



WILLIAM R. PHELAN 

Business Course 

"Bill's" familiar "How's tricks?" 
is well-known, as is his ambition, 
which is to become music supervisor 
in ^s^all city, after attending a good 
musflrschool. Band 1, 2, 3; orchestra 
3 ; arid operetta 2 have occupied much 
of "Bill's" tirH§.J$«He enjoys the Al- 
bum of Classical Music, but dislikes 
swing and the 9 :20 Club! (Is that 
possible?) He has a bad fault in 
blushing, and modestly confesses that 
he has no virtue. 



KENNETH WALLY 

Civics Course 

"Ken's" favorite expression seems 
to be "heavens!" and although he 
has no particular hobby now, some 
day he'd like to go to California. 
To be a cabinet-maker seems his am- 
bition. He doesn't like spinach, but 
does like women, Glenn Miller, and 
the color blue. 



HAROLD ERNEST SMITH 

Btoiness Course 

"pityrFy" or "Smitty" expects to go 
to vdo^'fih a defense plant and learn 
to be a fireman. Ambition is to be- 
come an engineer on a railroad. Fa- 
vorite program is Glenn Miller. Dis- 
likes girls. Worst fault is being 
Iazv. Best virtue is doing as he is 
told. Special mannerism is whistling 
in the hall. Hobby is stamp col- 
lecting. 



BE A 
RCO CROSS 







vdAQM CLSTtUUk K UKOfcD 






»o-^»n-^»04i»o^»-o-^»< >•«»<)< 






•Class of 






a, 


e 
o 
« 


2 








.s 




4>" 

c 


JS 


-w 
(A 




> 
•* 


o 


3 

•< 




Oi 


n 


n 






-* 


V) 




fr 




E 
3 




c* 


3 


-0 




3 


U 


< 




<-T 


C 
C 


"E 




41 

JC 


< 


1 




3 


(A 







c 

s 


1 


13 




41 


11 

c 


5 




$ 


1 


| 


- 


a 






a, 


s 


1 


§ 


IX 


o 


£ 


c 


< 
X 


«6 

2 




8 




H 


c 


3 




2 


o 


< 


§> 


i— > 

t/3 


U 
M 

w 


s 


J 


UJ 




-a 







(A 


Si 


e* 


a; 


^5 




m 




>» 

£ 


E 

-0 





O 


n 

o 

c 


3 

41 


Hi 

CA3 ' 


4> 

2 


m 


C 

E 


< 


e 
■2 


2 

"* 


3 

J/3 






M 






3 


41 


s 








lH 




J? 


• -* 
b 


O 




•4-* 


i> 


1 




(2 


c 

15 


e 





.2 


w 






S 






> 

o" 


1 

3 

BBS 


c 

41 
>, 




(A 




rt 




(A 


C 
O 


a 




(/I 

5 


41 

..38 


■fa 

"3 «i 




^ c 


i-c 


.. 41 




^'5 

32 


<u 


§ 2 






v. 






3« 





Class of 1942 






SENIOR PLAY 



"Heroes Just Happen" presented by the Class 
of 1942 was one of the most successful Senior 
plays ever presented at Waltham High School. 
The Play, directed by Mr. Thomas A. Roach, was 
presented at the South Junior Auditorium, Friday 
evening, April 12, 1942. 

The plot concerns the arrival of Joe Thompson, 
played by Charles Lane, at Ivy Lane High School. 
Joe is mistaken by the principal, Melvin Hayden, 
and his faculty, consisting of Audrey Kilgore, 
Eleanor Edwardson, Naomi Haag, Phyllis Erick- 
son, Clifford Adams and Robert Eaton, who 
think that he is "Flash" Thompson, a famous 
athlete and scholar. The real Flash was played 
by Sumner Goldman. Of course, many amusing 
incidents are brought about by this case of mis- 
taken identity, as Joe plays on the football team 
and also receives high scholastic grades on the 
strength of Flash's reputation rather than on the 
basis of accomplishment. 

Among the students at Ivy Lane we found 
Jeanne Webster, Joe's girl friend, and her friend 
Bud Green. Others were Mary Pavone, Elaine 



Fitzgerald, Jeanne Butcher, Phyllis Cronin, Lillian 
Merino, Ann Cusack, Austin Starr, Carlton Peter- 
son, Joseph Hill, and Newton Ruggles. The other 
members of the cast included Virginia Tuttle as 
Flash's mother, William Calkins as Joe's uncle 
Frank, and George Olson as Mr. Sirenson the fire 
chief, Joyce Hitchcock was the prompter. 

The Committee which produced the Senior Play 
was headed by Melvin Hayden. The members of 
the committee were: Edward Powers, Charles 
Lane, Mary Pavone, Carlton Peterson, Elaine Fitz- 
gerald, Adele Bettinson, Austin Starr, Walter 
Morrison, Frances Whitcomb, Robert Erickson, 
Joyce Hitchcock, Barbara Stenstrom, Joseph Hill, 
Frederick Melton, Ernest Yarmintino, Joan Mc- 
Clutchey, Frances Dougherty, and Phyllis Worrell. 
The ushers were Francis Barnicle, Seth Johnson, 
Joseph Stroum, Paul Green, Edgar Peterson, Roger 
Johnson, and Henry Joyal. The Candy Girls were 
June Kellogg, Adele Bettinson, Dorothy Hawker, 
Edith Brewster, Anne Bowler, Frances Sullivan, 
Anastasia Hayes, Patricia Power, Doris Eastman 
and Frances Whitcomb. 






_ Class of 1942 — 

Who'sWho 



Boy Most Likely To Succeed 
Charles Olney 




Girl Most Likely To Succeed ^. 
Joyce Hitchcock 




Most Popular Boy 
James LaRosee 



Most Popular Girl 
Marie Geisler 



Best Dressed Boy 
George Olson 



Most 
Studious Girl 
Joyce Hitchcock 

Most Studious Boy 
Charles Olney 



Most Athletic Girl 
Ruth Mitchell 





Brightest Social Light 
Doris Kilpatrick 



Best Dressed Girl 
Barbara Hellner 



Class Wit 
Robert Eaton 




Most Athletic Boy 
Edwin Thomas 





Best Looking Boy 
Seth Johnson 



Personality Plus 
Marjorie Selig f-fe 





Best Looking Girl 
Barbara Hellner 



Best Actor 
Melvin Hayden 



Best Actress 
Audrey Kilgore 





Glamour Girl 
Dorothy Hawker 




— — — -Class of 1942 









Class Will 



n 



E it remembered that 
we, tlie class of 1942, 



being of sound and disposing 
mind and memory and wish- 
ing to direct in what manner 
our possessions shall be dis- 
posed of after our departure 
do make and publish this, our 
last will and testament. Af- 
ter- the payment of our just 
debts we bequeath and de- 
vise as follows: 

To Mr. Goodrich, our capa- 
ble Commander-in-Chief, the 
head strategist against that 
ever present enemy, Ignor- 
ance, who has guided us to 
this day of victory, we confer 
a .medal for service and performance above and 
beyond the requirements of an ordinary head- 
master. 

To Mr. Ward, Waltham High's "Little Cor- 
poral" who when not directing miscreants to the 
guardhouse and checking up on A. W. O. L.'s is 
our amiable Dean of letters, we leave a small 
dictionary not to put in his pocket but to swallow, 
for he surely must eat some brain food to com- 
pose those lofty phrases every Monday morning. 

To Mr. Sheehy, our dynamic teacher of biology, 
the only man who made Dr. Warner, the scalp 
specialist throw up his hands in despair, that per- 
son who constantly reminds us of the inevitable 
fact that "some little bug is going to find you 
some day," we leave a microscopic slide of the 
average pupil's brain. If you can't find it at first, 
keep trying; it's there somewhere. 

To Mr. Hollis, our genial Master of the sci- 
ences, we bequeath a rocket ship. With this ad- 
vanced mode of transportation he will now be 
able to study first hand those remote celestial 
bodies. The ship is prepared to leave the Bleach- 




FRANCIS D. MacDOUGALL 
Writer of Class Will 



To Mr. Hodge, that promi- 
nent head of our history de- 
partment, the only man to re- 
verse the "An apple to the 
teacher" policy, who in the 
past has been given many 
apple orchards by departing 
Senior classes, we leave a 
truck to haul these apples to 
the High School. 

To those members of our 
faculty who have left or are 
leaving to join the armed 
forces of our country, we sup- 
ply an abundance of conduct 
cards. With these weapons 
they, theoretically, will be 
able to suspend any enemy 

ery smoke stack at your convenience, Mr. Hollis. 

action. These cards have been proved effective 

in use about Waltham High. 

As a special gift from IV B, we leave Mr. 
Mosher a sound proof room wherein he shall be 
free from any outside noises whatsoever. 

To Miss Allen, the Generalissimo of room No. 
114, we leave a super sound detector. With this 
auditory device she may now hear the grass grow- 
ing, what one electric light bulb says to the other, 
and the commotion of falling dust particles. These 
are about the only sounds Miss Allen does not 
hear at the present time. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Mr. Belliveau, 
Miss Nolan and Mr. Reynolds as co-executors of 
this, our last will and testament and we hereby 
direct said executors to pay all our just debts and 
costs of administration out of our estate and we 
hereby request that they be exempt from furnish- 
ing any surety or sureties on their official bonds. 
Signed— The Class of 1942 
By Francis D. MacDougall. 






—Class of 1942- 



Signed and sealed and published by the said 
class of 1942 as and for their last will and testa- 
ment in the presence of us, who at their request, 
and in their presence, and in the presence of each 

Codicil To The Last 

To Whom It May Concern: 

Know all men by these presents that we, the 
Class of 1942, being of sound and disposing 
mind and memory, and wishing to direct in what 
manner our estate shall be disposed of after our 
departure do make and publish this, the codicil 
to our last will and tsetament, hereby ratifying 
and confirming said will in all respects except as 
changes by this instrument. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Phyllis Erick- 
son to be the executrix of this, the codicil to our 
last will and testament and we hereby request that 
she be exempt from furnishing any surety or 
sureties on her official bond. 

To Charles Olney, the most studious boy in 
our class, that scholar who stifles himself with 
the accumulated knowledge of the ages, that poor 
fellow who lies buried beneath formulae and 
equations, we offer this enlightening study in ge- 
ometry and poetry. Tip: this type of problem 
can be best undertaken as homework. 

Our first lady of the stage, the girl who has re- 
cently been warned by the government that her 
fan mail consumes enough paper to build ten 
Japanese warships is none other than Audrey Kil- 
gore, who played the part of Mrs. Beasley in the 
Senior Play. To Audrey we give something which 
she has justly earned, a big hand. 

To Eddie Thomas, the most athletic boy in the 
Senior Class, the star who inspires little boys to 
eat their spinach so that they can grow up to be 
like him, we bestow this coveted set of auxiliary 
muscles. They were obtained at much expense 
from that well known surgeon, Dr. Baldeau, 
whose trucks are seen daily at the back door of 
such places as the First National and A and P 
super markets. When in use, avoid all stray dogs. 

Barbara Hellner, the girl who makes Vogue ap- 
pear as out of date as last week's map of the 
world, who when compared with the Duchess of 



other, have subscribed our names as witnesses 
thereto. Lionel Mosher 

Amy Burgess 
Francis Sheehy 

Will and Testament 

Windsor would make Wallis look like a grain 
bag edition of the real thing, has been voted the 
best dressed girl in the Senior Class. To Barbara 
we leave something which also is considered a 
chick creation. 

With the big spring drives opening up, we are 
reminded that the offense is the best defense. 
Consequently to Melvin Hayden, the best actor of 
the class whose talent spells success for any per- 
formance, we leave these over ripe vegetables. If 
Melvin should ever play before a discourteous 
audience who show their lack of appreciation by 
hurling leafy missiles, he may reach for his own 
ammunition and retaliate. 

To Ruth Mitchell, our most athletic girl, we 
leave these symbols of her prowess in the field of 
sports; a diamond and a hoop. These we hope 
will ever be a reminder of her renowned ability. 

To that dapper Dan, George Olson, the best 
dressed boy in the class, we leave an exclusive 
model of the much talked of "Victory Suit". This 
garment may not be conservative but it is con- 
serving. We are sure he will appreciate the free- 
dom of motion in the arms and legs also the ab- 
sence of buttons and other troublesome accessories. 

To Marjorie "Personality Plus" Selig, the girl 
who wins friends and influences hockey players, 
who needs no magnet to attract iron men, we 
leave this bomber that she may further distribute 
her winning ways. 

The most studious girl in our class, who has 
acquired the uncommon habit of always getting 
her clean report card smudged with six or seven 
messy A's, is Joyce Hitchcock. She deliberately 
tries to give the wrong answers, but nothing but 
the right ones can ever come out. To that member 
of our class who would make a fizzle of the quiz- 
zle kids, we leave a bottle of "coke" that she may 
quench her thirst for knowledge. 



., —Class of 1942 



The most popular boy in the class is our presi- 
dent, Jimmy La Rosee. At the present time he 
has a countless number of pals, as we all know, 
but sometime in the misty future, he may find 
himself destitute and alone. Therefore with this 
in mind we give Jimmy a compact supply of 
thousands of "Friends" that will surely stand by 
him. 

The most glamourous of glamour girls among 
us it Dot Hawker. To this belle who possesses 
all those mysterious charms from oomph to pazass, 
we offer a well known preparation that is guar- 
anteed to give a lasting finish to preserve that 
beauty that endures, namely, a can of enamel. 

To Seth Johnson, the best looking boy in the 
class of '42, that Greek god whom we see every 
day promenading in the corridors, stepping over 
the bodies of swooning women, ignoring the 
whistles and comments of "not bad" coming from 
the lips of his captivated following, who shyly 
lowers his eyes as he passes a group of entranced 
girls, we endow with this heavy club that will en- 
able him to break through all feminine inter- 
ference. 

The girl most likely to succeed of all our po- 
tential successes is Joyce Hitchcock. Joyce prom- 
ises to become an outstanding career girl. A 
career doesn't necessarily mean buying for Cronin's 
or managing a Woolworth store; however, the 
most promising career involves the finesse of bal- 
ancing a budget for two on one week's pay. 
Therefore, with a prophetic view we leave an 
item that may give a lift to her budget in — shall 
we say, 1945 ? 

To the damsel who knows everyone and is 
known by everyone, the most popular, Marie 
Geisler, we leave this pack of cards with which 
she may play solitaire on any night that there is 
nothing else to occupy her time. We feel safe 
in saying that these cards will still be unopened 
twenty years from now. 

We draw Bob Eaton away from locker No 970 
to present that student with the hair the teachers 
love to touch (they always have both hands in it) 
with an artichoke (Artie joke) . If our class wit 
should ever enlist and be sent to Iceland, he will 
have this gag in readiness. 



The girl you often turned to look at twice is 
Barbara Hellner, the best looking girl in the class. 
To that bewildering blonde, we give the big eye 
and who wouldn't like to give Barbara the big 
eye? 

The brightest social light of this season or any 
other as far as we are concerned is Doris Kil- 
patrick. To this vivacious lady-about-town, who 
after May 15, will be without sufficient gasoline to 
suit her needs, we leave a pair of roller skates. 
If anyone should see two shadowy forms gliding 
along through the streets in the night, don't be 
alarmed, it isn't an invasion; it's only Doris skat- 
ing home with her escort. 

To Charles Olney, the boy most likely to suc- 
ceed, we bequest this barrel of ample dimensions 
that he may salt away his predestined millions. 
If, however, by any cruel twist of fate his fortune 
is lost, we thoughtfully provide this pair of sus- 
penders which may be attached to the barrel. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Miss Spencer, 
Mr. Elliot and Miss Rockwood as co-executors of 
this, the codicil to our last will and testament and 
we hereby direct said executors to pay all our 
just debts and costs of administration out of our 
estate. We hereby request that they be exempt 
from furnishing any surety or sureties on their 
official bonds. 

In testimony whereof we hereunto set our hand 
and seal and publish and declare this to be the 
codicil to our last will and testament in the pres- 
ence of the witnesses named below, this third day 
of June A. D. 1942. 

Signed — The Class of 1942 
by — Francis D. MacDougall 
Signed sealed and published by the said Class 
of 1 942 as and for the codicil to their last will 
and testament in the presence of us who at their 
request, and in their presence, and in the presence 
of each other have subscribed our names as wit- 
nesses thereto. 

Ralph C. Hollis 
Doris M. Estabrook 
John L. Leary 



»-->-«MKi ■<■!&. [)■«=»()< 



Class of 1942 — « —«— «>— «* 




C/^m P^/^ 



DORIS ANN BESSO 
Class Poet 



TO THE CLASS OF "FORTY-TWO" 

This graduation day we face the years 

Embittered and chaotic; struggle-torn. 

Strife challenges our courage, shakes and scars 
The high ideals to which we were born. 

Fair peace lies ravished by some ruthless hand 

While hate and greed enslave a bleeding world 

And panic overshadows all the land. 

O'er this will youth's bright banner be unfurled ! 

Those classmates missing from our ranks today 

Are filling spaces in the battle line. 
No longer schoolboys, shouting as they play, 

They're fighting for their country, yours and mine. 

We must not fear so long as God on high 

Remains the final judge of right and wrong. 

To Him the souls in anguish send their cry. 
To Him the final verdict will belong. 

And may we all, some soon day, see the end 

Of all these battles, bloodshed, tears and pain: 

When nation greets each nation as a friend 

And peace, revived again, on earth shall reign. 



■Class of 1942 



l^-flT wa s a typical beauti- 
fapgJ ful California day. The 

sun was beating mildly down 
on Hollywood Boulevard and 
a gentle west wind from the 
Pacific was making the weath- 
er ideal. I got up slowly 
from the bench upon which 
I had been reclining and 
walked over to the curb 
where I paused to take a 
quick look up the boulevard 
and to brush ^ few imaginary 
specks of dirt from my spot- 
less white suit. I then 
stepped into the street and 
proceeded slowly north, push- 
ing papers and rubbish ahead 
of me with my broom. I suddenly caught sight 
of a wealthy-looking man, who strangely enough, 
looked like Andy Cay, throwing away a news- 
paper. I went over quickly and picked it up, 
watching him all the while, hoping that he might 
throw away a half-smoked cigarette. He didn't, 
however, and this confirmed my suspicions. 

With a sigh of disappointment I turned into a 
nearby park to read the paper. I found it to be 
a strange paper when I opened it, called "THE 
WASTEBASKET REVIEW" and published by 
the Walter Morrison Publishing Company, Boston. 
The headlines blared the story of a great Wal- 
tham High reunion. I had hardly settled myself 
to read the article when a harsh rasping voice 
reached my ears from the opposite side of some 
nearby bushes. I listened carefully. It could'nt 
be my boss; Ken Nickerson doesn't sound like 
that. My curiousity was aroused, so I carefully 
pried a few branches aside. There, standing on 
a large soap box, I saw Bing Miller. As I 
listened he was saying, 

"War is just a big business — that's all. If 
we took the profit out, there would be no war." 



Class Prophecy 




JOSEPH FRANCIS HILL 
Class Prophet 



Having already heard that 
one, I let the bushes spring 
back into place. I then tucked 
the paper into an inside 
pocket and trundled my truck 
over to the next block where 
I happened on my old buddy, 
Jack Lackenbauer. Jack was 
dressed in a spotless, white 
Palm Beach suit. I walked 
up to him and gave him a 
friendly tap on the back 
causing him to drop the 
pointed stick with which he 
had been picking up papers. 
When he had recovered his 
equilibrium, I shoved the pa- 
per under his nose. 

" n 'hrow that stick away," I ordered. "We're 
goihg home for a reunion." 

Jack refused to get excited, however, and he 
took a letter from his pocket and handed it to 
me. It was date-lined the day before. 

"Dear Jack, (It read) 

Just a short note to thank you for the set of 
African Dominoes you sent me. They have more 
than come in handy. Yesterday I met an old 
friend — Fred Milan — he's a chauffeur for 
Barbara Hellner, the movie actress. After a while 
we played a few innings of African Baseball, 
during which I won the car. I learned that there's 
to be a reunion back in Waltham. If you want 
to go I'll pick you up tomorrow. 

Bill Calkins." 

I had just finished reading the letter when I 
noticed a large Buick careening down the street 
with its horn blaring. It was filled to overflowing 
with beautiful starlets. 

"I'll bet this is Bill," said Jack. 

Bill pulled up in front of us with a screech of 
brakes. 






"Hi 'ya, fellars," he yelled. "Meet the boys 
and girls." 

We looked in the car and among those whom 
we saw were Doris Kilpatrick, Dot Hawker, Doris 
Besso, and Mary Meegan — we did not see any 
boys. 

"Oh, yes," he said. "You see I'm allergic to 
competition — look under the hood." 

We rushed to the front of the car and lifted 
the hood ; there (one on each side) were Loren 
Neff and Russ Carlson; both were reading funny 
books. We replaced the hood and got in the 
back seat in spite of Bill's insisting that we ride 
in the trunk. He shifted into gear, and a few 
moments later we turned into the great East- West 
Express Highway, and Bill pushed the needle up 
to 70 M. P. H. 

"What do you think of this buggy, fellas?" he 
asked. 

Just then a huge passenger bus whizzed past, 
going even faster than Doris Kilpatrick can talk. 

"I'll bet Paul Green was driving," said Jack. 
"I saw a sign in front — 'Co-pilot wanted'." 

We sped rapidly on, and, as we passed through 
Kansas City, the mudguards fell off. In the Ken- 
tucky Mountains we pulled into a service station 
for gas. To our surprise the attendants turned 
out to be Jim Scafidi and Ronald Lund. Jimmy, 
it seems, takes care of the servicing, while Lund 
acts as the pneumatic hoist on all grease jobs. 
While we were parked there, a tall bedraggled 
looking tramp — wearing spats, came limping up 
the road. He was immediately recognized by the 
girls as George (call me "Loving Cup") Olsen. 
He came over and shook hands all around. 

"How did you get here?" he was asked. 

"Wal," he said, "I do a lot of traveling. You 
all know how unhealthy trains are, with their 
smoke and every thing. To conserve my health 
I usually ride the rods. A short while ago I met 
up with a tough railroad cop, who threw me oSL 
the train — gee that Edson Blanchard is a 
bruiser!" 

We climbed into the car and Bill was about to 
pay for the gas in lead quarters when a shot rang 
out and a loud voice yelled, 

"Git them revenooers out of here!" 



It sounded (strangely enough) like Roger 
Morris. 

"Is that you, Sebastian?" I called. 

He recognized my voice and came out of the 
woods. I had not heard from him since the time 
he had joined the Marines by arguing that four 
eyes are better than two. 

"Well, Rog," we asked, "how did you make 
out in the war?" 

"Fine", he said; "I met Phil Hemeon over in 
Japan, just after we captured Tokio, and we made 
a fortune selling hara-kiri swords to the Japs. I 
invested my money in real estate and I've started 
a little colony here. Austin Starr, Jake Anthony, 
and John Russo have settled here and Carol 
Hartley and Agnes Foley run a beauty parlor, 
while Naomi Haag runs a boarding house. 

Bill Calkins yelled "All aboard" and a few 
seconds later we were again speeding down the 
road. Nightfall found us nearing Philadelphia 
and we decided to stop for the night at some re- 
spectable looking hotel. We found one and over 
the door of it hung a picture of a top sergeant. 
Appropriately enough the place was known as 
"FALL INN". As we drove up, Sparky Adams, 
the doorman, came out and reached for the handle 
of the car door — it came off in his hands, and 
he walked away disgruntled. When we entered 
the hotel, we were greeted by the proprietor — 
a notorious character called Barney Barnicle — 
who ushered us over to the desk where Elaine 
Fitzgerald was busy dusting off the register and 
shaking cobwebs from the inkwell. Harold Hen- 
ley was present as house detective. As we were 
about to sign the register, a group of tourists, 
which included Barbara Stenstrom, Helen Fitz- 
gerald, Jane Turner, and Marie Geisler, (led by 
Phyllis Cronin,) burst in through the front door. 
Phyllis looked the place over with a calculating 
eye. "I don't think it's so hot," she said, and 
with that they stalked out. We finished register- 
ing. Barney then punched a button and yelled 
"Front", whereupon three feminine pages ap- 
peared to take our baggage. They were Helen 
Eccles, Beverly MacNally and Phyllis Worrell. 

We had all walked over to the elevators when 
Barney informed us that only three of us would 



* .._,_, — „_j — ™>*tlass of 1942 



»0-4»n«»ii4»O.M».i)4 



M>«»n«»ii« 



be able to ride in the elevator; the rest would 
have to walk. The reason for this was soon ap- 
parent as the elevator door opened and we saw 
Sumner Goldman standing there — all five square 
yards of him. Jack, Bill and I all crowded in and 
left the girls to walk up. We turned in early that 
night and slept soundly until about 8 o'clock the 
next morning, when we were awakened by a 
series of blood-curdling screams which came from 
the room next to ours. 

"What's that?" asked Jack. 

"Probably a mouse in the girls' room," said 
Bill. 

"It can't be," said Jack; "the girls' room is on 
the other side." We got up quickly, put on our 
bathrobes and prepared to combat this unknown 
menace. After opening the door and creeping 
down the hall, we saw on the door of the next 
room a sign which answered our questions. It 
read "Carlton Peterson — Painless Dentistry". 
As we stood there the door opened and Dave 
Wanberg and Rog Johnson came out bearing be- 
tween them a stretcher on which lay Frannie 
MacDougall. Carl then appeared in the door- 
way. "Won't you gentlemen please come in?" he 
said. In five seconds flat we had ourselves barri- 
caded in our room. 

Because we wanted to see certain sights around 
town, we dressed quickly and, down to breakfast. 
The hostess was none other than Marjorie Hollis. 
She showed us to a table and Lillian Whelply 
hurried over to take our orders. She told us to 
expect good food since Lorraine LaRosee and 
Mildred Connors were the cooks, assisted by Tony 
Castellano. She also told us to watch our step or 
Warren Chase, the bouncer, would throw us out. 

After finishing a hearty meal, we went out to 
see the sights. On walking a short distance down 
the street we found Shibe Park, the home of the 
mighty Philly's. As we were passing we noticed 
a sign, on one of the doors, which read — "James 
LaRosee, President". When we entered, Jim was 
busily pouring over the records of his team. 

"What are your team's chances?" we asked him. 

"Well," he said, "I think we have a good chance 
to take the title away from the Braves. I figure 
that John Clancy will win another 20 games and 



Eddie Thomas will win as many — if he'll learn 
to settle down. Yesterday a man stole second, 
third, and home while Eddie was waving to Peggy 
Ryan — that's bad." 

We nodded in sympathy. 

"Are there any other Waltham men playing for 
you?" we asked. 

"Bob Clark is playing left field," he said. 
"Rollie Dion is at third, Bud Mallin catch, Joe 
Stroum second base. We also have a fellow by 
the name of Seth Johnson who is working out 
with the ground crew." 

We left Jim then and continued our stroll. A 
few blocks further we came across a huge bill- 
board which announced the opening concert of 
the Philadelphia Symphony orchestra, with Miss 
Jeanette Kaufman conducting, and William Phelan 
as guest solist. Across the street from this we 
noticed a huge building which bore the inscrip- 
tion "The Home of Yamartino's Magic Pencil." 
As we looked, the front door burst open and Ernie 
came running down the step yelling "Eureka" 
(meaning I've found it) . He stopped short as 
he saw us. 

"Hi, fellas," he said; "you know what — I've 
just invented a magic pen to go with my magic 
pencil — they're guaranteed to write all the an- 
swers." With that he left us and dashed up the 
street yelling "Eureka!" 

"This town's screwey," said Bill; "let's get out 
of here." 

A short while later we were again on the road, 
headed this time toward New York. A few miles 
out of Philadelphia we passed a large girls' pri- 
vate school which we learned was run by Miss 
Eleanor Edwardson (who is affectionately known 
to her students as Wuvvy) . The girls' athletics 
are under the direction of Gwen Elroy. 

The clock on the Charles Olney building, the 
home of Charles Olney Industries, Inc., was 
striking a rather unmelodious seven as we pulled 
into Times Square. The newsboys were on the 
street with papers whose headlines blared — MEL 
HAYDEN ELECTED MAYOR — FRANCIS 
LeBLANC CHARGES BALLOT BOXES 
STUFFED. We decided to go over and see Mel 
and congratulate him. We turned to the editorial 



Xlass of 1942 



«* 



page and on reading an article by Bob Erickson, 
the owner and publisher of the paper, we learned 
that in one precinct with a population of 7000, 
Hayden had received 10,000 votes. 

On the way across town we saw a squad of 
seven mounted police coming out of 57th Street. 
The first five were mounted on beautiful stallions 
while the last two (whom we recognized as 
Splinter Dougherty and Newton Ruggles) were 
riding Shetland ponies. As we pulled up in 
front of the HAYDEN-FOR-MAYOR head- 
quarters, a feminine page came over and reached 
for the door handle and then went away disgusted 
on finding there was none. She looked strangely 
enough like Jeanne Butcher. As we entered, 
Adele Bettinson handed us cards which bore 
Hayden's campaign slogan, to wit: "VOTE FOR 
HAYDEN, THE LESSER OF TWO EVILS"! 
We saw Mel over in a corner surrounded by his 
admiring workers, among whom we recognized 
Muriel Geisler, Carol Peeling, Marjorie Selig, and 
Alice Borden. Mel was all excited. 

"Isn't it wonderful?" he kept saying. "Isn't it 
wonderful?" 

"Calm down, Mel," we said; "we knew you'd 
be elected". 

"Elected," he said. "I'm not talking about 

that ■ — d'ya know what, Bessie just had a 

I mean I wrote a play and it's going to be pre- 
sented on Broadway tonight." 

We were stunned. 

"What type of play did you write?" we asked 
cautiously. 

"Come along and see," he said. 

It was only a short walk from campaign head- 
quarters to James Biggins's LITTLE THEATRE 
— JUST-UP-THE- ALLEY where the play was to 
be presented. High above the entrance we saw, 
in lights, the names of Charles Lane and Audry 
Kilgore. The play was a tragedy entitled "Four 
Years at Waltham High, or, We Want Student 
Government." The plot was woven around a 
small group of seniors, in this mythical school, 
who, after spending three years in school and 
after much earnest discussion, concluded that 
Student Government would be the best thing pos- 
sible for their school. On seeing the play, I con- 



cluded that it was strictly autobiographical, j In 
the second act — in which the hero is pleading 
with the principal to give Student Government a 
trial — we were overcome by our memories and 
sorrowfully left. As we were leaving, Jeanne 
Webster — who was playing a major role — was 
injured by a flying bunch of broccoli and we took 
her to Mount Sinai Hospital where we renewed 
acquaintances with the head nurse, — who turned 
out to be none other than Lillian Merino. When 
we entered her office, she was engaged in reading 
a bit of poetry written by a young interne, — 
George Sederquist. We had a little trouble get- 
ting out of the hospital — Dick LeBlanc, who is 
one of the doctors, recognized us and kept in- 
sisting we be placed in psycopathic. 

Once outside we ran into more trouble — some 
hard-up gent had stolen the car. We all went 
over to a taxi stand and climbed into one (which 
was driven by a member of next year's class) and 
proceeded to Grand Central Station, where we 
took a sleeper to Boston. Early the next morning 
the train pulled into Boston and we were awak- 
ened by Porter Bob Kelley. A short way up the 
street we found an automobile rental service run 
by Cliff Adams. When we asked for news, Cliff 
told us that Joyce Hitchcock had been recently ap- 
pointed principal at Waltham High School and 
that she had immediately installed Student Gov- 
ernment. Overjoyed at this bit of news, we hired 
a car and started for Waltham. I say "started" 
because we were soon stopped by Policeman Henry 
Joyal — who proceeded to give us four tickets — one 
for court and three for the Policeman's Ball. As 
we stopped at the traffic lights in Central Square, 
we caught sight of Bob Eaton and Joan McClutchy 
coming down the street, followed by all the little 
Eatons. The lights changed and we turned into 
what was formerly Church Street — now named 
Hemeon Avenue in honor of Waltham's Marine 
hero. On our right we saw a huge neon sign 
advising one and all to stop at Jungle Jim Mula's 
Barber Shop. We hurried on however, because 
we wanted to get a look at the new Waltham 
High. As we turned into School Street, Bill 
Calkins gave a gasp of astonishment and Jack 
Lackenbauer said something in Spanish (probably 



»V-/J.diJJ \J L X /Imihh»o ■«•-,..«»-.•«► -^. imki +m-0'm*-<)+^<^^;>-^m-<) 



poetry) and on looking I saw, standing where our 
high school had stood, an exact duplicate of the 
Little Red School House. As we looked, five 
teachers emerged from the building. They were 
Phyllis MacArthur, Jean Bearisto, Mary Pavone, 
Mr. Reynolds, and Miss Spencer. Mary carried a 
bell which she proceeded to ring to call the stu- 
dents and pupils to class. Among those who 
answered the call was an unnamed person who re- 
ceived a blank diploma in the class of '42. 

As we sat staring at the place a prosperous- 
looking gentleman came out of a nearby house and 
came over to the car. It was Thornton Regan. 
He told us that he had risen to the position of 
chief stockboy at Parke Snows, and that he had 
Herb Nelson and Puppy Powers working under 
him. Ken Murphy pulled up in a huge Packard 
Limousine and Regan introduced him as the 
President of the Chamber of Commerce. Ken 
shook hands all around. 



"Gee, Bill," he said, "you look awfully pale." 
'Never felt better in my life," said Bill. 

"You're awfully quiet," said Jack. 

"I've been thinking," said Bill; "we didn't 
really appreciate school until we got out." 

We all choked in surprise. "Bill," I said se- 
verely, "You have been out in the sun without a 
hat." 

The bell clanged again bringing our attention 
back to the school. 

"I almost wish that I were back in high school," 
said Jack. 

"You, too?" I asked. 

'Seriously though," said Bilk "we did have a 
great time when we were there, and we do owe 
our teachers more than we can ever repay." 
Five heads nodded in agreement. 

Joseph Francis Hill, Jr. 



FLYING HIGH 

Up among the clouds I rode 
Away from life, routine, and mode; 
Way up here the peaceful sky, 
Up in the blue, I'm flying high. 

Up here in peace my thoughts would soar; 

Up here the world was not at war. 
And then my peace was split asunder, 
War planes belching flame and thunder. 

They came at me; 

They dived and roared — 
I couldn't see 

While flame soared. 

And then my number 

Called on high; 
I knew right then 

I was to die. 

Theodore T. Trott, Jr., '44. 






«, — : ;c Q ass f 1942- 



> i >■*=■»■< >-^»< i-^^o-^^ih 



CLASS OFFICERS 



FRESHMAN 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Audi tot- 
President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Auditor 

President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Auditor 



Effie Bohanon 

Roy Arbuthnot 

Betty Viles 

Marjorie Jones 



SOPHOMORE 



JUNIOR 



Conrad Erickson 

Muriel Landry 

Joanne Johnson 

Robert Bruce 

Charles Butler 

Nancy Calkins 

Jeanne Franks 

Alfred Dion 



-Class of 1942- 



-- i-CE — ■-• i -!TT-> '»«■>' !■*■»- 1 i«»ii«»ii«»'HBH !■*»> '>.<M*(i-*»-'>*»»-<>.4Ul><*.^ 



CLASS ADVISORS 




MR. GEORGE L. WARD, Sa^-Af^/es- 
Senior Class Advisor 




CLASS ADVISORS 

Mr. Frank Sheehy, Juniors, /e//; 

Mr. Ralph Hollis, Sophomores, ;vg/>/ 




sssmf 



;i 



AMERICA- 
ON TttE 
MARCH 





*H 






A ctiuities 





. JSCIjI* * iSSK ft J^6£*i 



4=i 








»%>.^»(>4H*<><^»0«»<>-«B-<>-^»-(>-*^<>-«»-<>-ttra-< )4 



— —class of 1942- 







COACHES 
Mr. Walter Brinn, Hockey, Track 

Mr. John Leary, Football, Baseball 

Mr. Arthur Quinn, Basketball 




FACULTY MANAGERS 
Left to right: Mr. Gallagher, Tennis; Mr. Mosher, Golf; Mr. Hodge. Football; 

Mr. Hood, Hockey. 



„,_ , . — Class of 1942 



FOOTBALL 




L— 13 



THE 1941-42 TEAM IN POSITION 
RARING TO GO! 
Line: R. E. John Furdon; R. T. Francis Mallin; R. G. Anthony Romano; C. Seth Johnson; L. G. Robert Miller; 

L T. Sumner Goldman; L. E. Richard Gately 
Backfield: R. H. B. Ken Nickerson; L. H. B. Mai Julia no; Q. B. Edwin Thomas; F. B. Charlie Butler 



A record of four victories, a tie, and four de- 
feats is usually a poor season for a Waltham High 
football team; but when one considers that two 
of these victories were from arch rivals, Newton 
and Brockton, and that not one game was lost 
by more than a touchdown, one can see that the 
Crimson had a fairly successful season after all. 

The team got off to a good start when it held 
a powerful Providence Central eleven to a score- 
less tie, and then a week later walked off with a 
two-touchdown victory over a weak Lawrence 
team. When Waltham came home with a 13 to 
6 victory over Somerville hopes ran high for a 
really good season. But Fate stepped in, and the 
Crimson proceeded to lose four straight decisions, 
each of which could have been won with a little 
more power at the enemy goal-line. Rindge Tech 
eked out a one-point victory, and Haverhill, Lynn 
English, and Medford all won by a single touch- 
down. Then an aroused Waltham eleven came 
back and defeated a favored Newton team, and 



on Thanksgiving Day the Crimson decisively 
whipped Brockton for a 13 to victory. 

The Crimson had a capable backfield headed 
by Charlie Butler, an excellent punter, and Mai 
Juliano, a small but shifty runner. Eddie Thomas, 
Connie Erickson, and Ken Nickerson also did 
well in the backfield. Defensive standouts in the 
line were Johnny Furdon, Jimmy Larosee, Dick 
Gately, Seth Johnson and Bud Mallin. 





SCHEDULE 




Providence Centra] 


Waltham 



Opponents 



Lawrence 


12 





Somerville 


13 


6 


Rindge Tech 
Haverhill 


12 



13 
6 


Lynn English 
Medford 


2 



6 

7 


Newton 


12 


6 


Brockton 


13 










THE FOOTBALL TEAM IN ACTION 

Top Left: A scramble for the ball in the Somerville game, Waltham recovering 

Lower Left: Eddie Thomas and Charlie Butler moving up to help Ken Nickerson making the tackle. 

Right: Gately intercepting a pass in the Medjord game 









HOCKEY 



mm 




THE TEAM THAT MADE HOCKEY HISTORY 
R. W. Herbert O'Reilly; C. Charlie Butler; L. W. Edwin Thomas; R. D. Ken Nickerson; L. D. Seth Johnson- 
G. Henry Littlefield Spares: Robert Adams, Joseph Madden 



Given only an outside chance to win the Bay 
State League Hockey championship, Waltham 
-High's fighting hockey team amazed everyone by 
doing just that while winning all but two games 
in league competition. Waltham was actually tied 
with Watertown in number of points, but Wal- 
tham was awarded the championship on the basis 
of its superiority in net goals. Because of its fine 
performance in league competition, Waltham was 
awarded a place in the New England high School 
hockey tournament. In its first game Waltham 
defeated a strong Wakefield sextet, but was com- 
pletely overpowered by the ultimate winner of the 
tournament, Melrose High, in the semi-finals. 

The team was sparked by co-captain Charles 
Butler, who led the league in scoring and received 
the most valuable player award. Eddie Thomas 
was also a timely scorer and teamed up with 
Butler and Herbie O'Reilly to give Waltham one 
of the slickest forward lines in schoolboy hockey. 
Seth Johnson and Ken Nickerson, two valuable 



defensemen, were great at breaking up enemy 
rushes and provided goalie Hank Littlefield with 
great support. 

SCHEDULE 
(INTER-LEAGUE GAMES) 

Waltham Opponents 

Brookline 3 l 

Newton 5 2 

Rindge Tech 1 2 

(BAY STATE LEAGUE GAMES) 

Walpole 2 3 

B. C High 6 2 

Framingham 4 2 

Watertown 1 3 

Quincy 2 1 

Needham 4 2 

Wellesley 2 

(TOURNAMENT GAMES) 

Wakefield 3 2 

Melrose 1 4 



Class of 1942- 




CO-CAPTAIN CHARLIE BUTLER 

High Scorer of the Bay State League of which Waltham High was the 
1942 champion. Charlie was also selected as the League's outstanding 
player and accordingly received the Charles Scrymageour Trophy. 



— Class of 1942- 




THE BASKETBALL SQUAD 

Kneeling, L. to R.\ Connie Erickson, Roger Johnson, Clifford Adams, Leonard Keyes, Robert Dorval 
Standing, L. to R. : Robert Joyce, Student Mgr., Robert Lally, Joseph Stroum, Richard Gately, Kenneth Murphy, 
Charles Clark, Carl Scafidi 



BASKETBALL 

The basketball team this season was not up to 
the par of other Waltham High court teams as 
it won only three league games during a stiff 
Suburban League campaign. Single victories over 
Arlington, Newton, and Cambridge Latin were 
all the Crimson could get in league strife. Cap- 
tain John Furdon and Cliff Adams, the only vet- 
erans from last year's varsity, formed the backbone 
of the team, and both played steady ball through- 
out the season. They were capably supported by 
tall Roger Johnson, Johnny Demarco, and an all- 
sophomore quintet consisting of Al Rhodenizer, 
Lenny Keyes, Carlo Scafidi, Connie Erickson, and 
Bob Dorval. As the sophomores will be return- 
ing next year as an experienced team, hopes are 
high for a good season in league play. 



SCHEDULE 

(NON-LEAGUE GAMES) 

Waltham Opponents 

Alumni 37 36 

Woburn 17 25 

Watertown 31 19 

Woburn 32 16 

Watertown 21 23 

Trade 54 35 

(LEAGUE GAMES) 

Rindge Tech 22 33 

Brookline 23 47 

Cambridge Latin 19 22 

Newton 29 28 

Arlington 35 30 

Rindge Tech 22 30 

Brookline 21 37 

Cambridge Latin 38 34 

Arlington 23 25 

Newton 33 34 



■Class of 1942- 



vo^i"«>o-« 



GIRLS SPORTS 



Another year at Waltham High has drawn to 
a close, leaving many dear memories of school 
days to the outgoing Seniors, and bringing many 
promises of new friends and activities to the in- 
coming Freshmen. At any rate, with the end of 
the school term comes the end of school sports, 
much to the regret of all. To Seniors it is the 
end of teamwork with fellow students and chums 
of their childhood. Yet sports have given to 
these Seniors not only a chance for physical fit- 
ness, but a sound sense of coordination and a feel- 
ing of fair play and teamwork. Our Juniors, 
Sophomores, and Freshmen have throughout the 
year wholeheartedly played their sports with com- 
mendable enthusiasm and sincerity. 

The season began in the early fall with Field 
Hockey. The hockeyists won the Needham game, 
tied the Weston game, and lost the Newton game. 
The Senior team triumphed in the inter-class 
series. 



SENIOR TEAM 

M. Melledy 
P. Cronin 
R. Mitchell 

A. Hayes 

D. Kilpatrick 

B. Lassen 

H. Fitzgerald 
V. Cullen 

D. Bradley 
G. Elroy 

E. Fitzgerald 
D. Besso 

T. Mace 



SOPH-JUNIOR TEAM 
M. Pearce 
H. Dunbrack 
V. Ballou 
C. Costa 

A. Cullen 

R. Tumminell 
M. McSheffrey 
M. Castellano 
M. Dion 
M. Conrad 

B. Cousins 
V. Caswell 
S. Gray 



With the cold weather came basketball, a fast 
moving game and a proven weight reducer. We 
played three out-of-town games. By winning the 
Cambridge and Needham games the girls came out 
with a two-to-one ratio after losing the Weston 
game. 

CLASS TEAM 
M. Geisler 
A. Foster 
V. Cullen 
R. Mitchell 
P. McArthur 
J. Bennett 
G. Cheney 
A. Hayes 



The next sport on the calendar was Volley Ball, 
and I assure you one has to be strictly on the beam 
to keep that featherweight ball in the air. As I 
heard it through the key-hole of the locker room 
door, the Sophs beat the Juniors who beat the 
Seniors who in turn beat the Sophs. At any rate, 
from the combined points the Sophs were the vic- 
tors. Because of the short season, there were no 
out-of-town games. 

Doris Ann Besso. 



n-=Xi<=* 



Class of 1942— 

BASEBALL 




: 1 



AL DION 

Captain 



As the Mirror goes to press, Waltham High's 
baseball team has a record of two wins and two 
defeats in Suburban League competition. After 
losing the first two games of the season to power- 
ful Cambridge Latin and Arlington, the Crimson 
made an about-face and captured the next two con- 
tests from Brookline and Rindge Tech. The team 
consists of practically all veterans, with Bud Mal- 
lin behind the bat, Seth Johnson, Joe Stroum, 
Mike Koulopolous, and Royce Taylor in the in- 
field and John Clancy, Captain Al Dion, and 
Bob Clark in the outfield. The mound assign- 
ments are taken care of by Bob Joyce, Ralph 
Hitchcock, Eddie Thomas ; and outfielder Clancy 
who also takes his turn on the mound. 





SCHEDULE 




Middlesex 


Waltham 
13 


Opponents 

4 


Cambridge Latin 

Arlington 

Brookline 


5 

8 


10 
12 

5 


Rindge Tech 


16 


7 


Newton 


1 


10 


Watertown 


8 


10 


Arlington 
Watertown 


7 
10 


19 
12 


Newton 


4 


2 


Cambridge Latin 


5 


4 



TRACK 



Due to transportation difficulties, the Waltham 
High track team awaits an abbreviated six-meet 
schedule this year. With the graduation of Eddie 
Demarais, last year's track star, Waltham is left 
without any outstanding track man. But Coach 
Brinn has gathered together a small but capable 
squad that promises to give plenty of opposition 
to larger and more experienced teams. Members 
of the team include Dick Seigien, a triple threat 
man in the broad jump, shot put, and high jump; 
Don Barnes in the dashes and high jump; Harry 



Berg and Bill Demarais in the dashes; and Win 
Burdett in the half mile. 

SCHEDULE 

Waltham Opponents 
April 23 Cambridge Latin 30 42 

May 1 Watertown 
May 12 Lexington 
May 16 State Relays, Belmont 
May 19 Winchester 
May 23 State Championship at Newton 



•Class of 1942 



WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL CHEERS 



Rah! 
Rah! 



CHEER 
Waltham High! Rah 
V. aitham High! Rah 
Jioo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Waltham High! Rah! Rah! 
Team! Team! Team! 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
Waltham! Waltham! Waltham! 



CHEER 8 
Give 'em the ax, the ax, the ax, 
Give 'em the ax, the ax, the ax, 
Give 'em the ax, the ax, the ax, 
Where? 

In the neck, the neck, the neck, 
In the neck, the neck, the neck, 
In the neck, in the neck, 
There! 



CHEER 2 
Oh me, oh, my, oh mother! 
Oh mother, oh me, oh my! 
Three cheers for Dick and Buster 
And the boys of Waltham High. 



CHEER 9 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
That's how you spell it! 
Here's how you yell it 
WAL-THAM, WAL-THAM, WAL-THAM. 



CHEER 3 
Waltham, rah rah team! (or name) 
or Waltham, rah rah (last name) 



CHEER 4 
Booma lacka, booma lacka, 
Bow, wow, wow! 
Chicka lacka, chicka lacka, 
Chow, chow, chow! 
Booma lacka, chicka lacka, 
Sis! boom! bah! 
Waltham High School, 
Rah, Rah, Rah! 



CHEER 10 
W with an A, with a WAL, with a WALTH, H 

with an A with an HAM, with a WALTHAM. 
L with an E, with an LEA, with LEARY, W 

with an H with a WHS 
Three cheers for Waltham High! 



CHEER 11 
Waltham High, Rah, Rah! 
Waltham High, Rah, Rah! 
Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Waltham High, rah, rah! 
Team! Team! Team! 



CHEER 5 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
Waltham! Waltham! Waltham! 
(optional) team! team! team! 



CHEER 6 
Wal-tham! Wal-tham! Wal-tham! 
Siss! boom! bah! 



CHEER 12 
1-2-3-4, 3-2-1-4, Who for? what for? 
Who ye going to yell for? 
Team! Team! Team! or (name) 



CHEER 13 
Strawberry Shortcake! blueberry pie! 

V-I-C-T-O-R-Y 
Are we in it? 
Well I guess! 
Waltham High School, yes, yes, yes! 



CHEER 7 
Yea Waltham! Yea! team! (or high) 
Yea, yea Waltham team! (or high) 
Yea (first name)! yea (last name)! 



CHEER 14 
Come on red, come on white! 
Waltham, let's fight! 



■Class of 1942- — — — — — ~— ~~~~-™* 



A FOOTBALL SONG 

Words and Music by 
Elsie M. Cheney, Class of 1930 
Give a cheer for Waltham, 
Make it loud and strong. 
Give a cheer for the team mates, 
Then they'll know we're helping them along. 
Cheer the team to Victory, 
Let the colors fly, 
For it's W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
For Waltham High. 

REFRAIN 
Can't you hear your schoolmates spelling? 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
Can't you hear them yelling? 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
Waltham! Waltham! 
Rah, rah, rah, rah, rah - RAH! 
Give a cheer for Waltham, 
Make it loud and strong. 
Give a cheer for the team mates, 
Then they'll know we're helping them along. 
Cheer the team to Victory, 
Let the colors fly, 
For it's W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
For Waltham High. 
Cheer the team when winning, 
Cheer the Red and White. 
Cheer the team when they're losing, 
With our cheers we'll help their fight. 
If cheers will bring a Victory, 
Another cheer we'll try, 
For it's W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
And Waltham High. 

REFRAIN 



WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL SONG 

Adapted by A. N. Burke from the Victory March 
Song of Wesleyan University 

Here comes the team, boys, banners let fly 
They're bound to win for old Waltham High. 
Ring out the chorus, we'll sing our songs once 

again, 
And give a cheer for each of the men, RAH! 

RAH! RAH! 

Out from the barge they dash to the field 
On to the fray, and the glory 'twill yield, 
While we all cry, "Win boys or die! 
For you are striving for the fame of Waltham 
High." 

CHORUS 

Then, stick to it boys, play the gave ev'ry man, 
Fight it to a finish, do the best that you can. 
While we shout "Victory!" While we shout 

"Victory!" 
While we shout "Victory and Waltham High 

forever! " 
The red and white, boys, can't lose the fray, 
The colors must win new laurels today. 
So while they're fighting let's show we have no 

fears, 
And make the hills tremble with our cheers, 

RAH! RAH! RAH! 

Then, when we've won, boys, ring loud the bell! 
Let its old voice the glad tidings tell, 
While we proclaim the glorious name 
Of our beloved High School, dear old Waltham 
High. 

CHORUS 



BATTLE CRY 

Adapted by A. N. Burke from a Football Song 

of Wesleyan University 
Onward we're marching to victory 
With song and cheer, 

Let the game begin, for we're here to win; 
Ev'ry heart is devoid of fear. 
Put forth ev'ry ounce of strength, boys, 
Make ready to do or die; 
And, while you are fighting, we're here 
Shouting our Battle cry, Hi-yi! 
REFRAIN 

Then we'll fight for old Waltham High! 

Never give in. Fight to the end boys, 

Might and right will win, 

So keep on fighting 'til victory 

Crowns every guy. 

Then it's fight, fight, fight, 

For Waltham High. 

Break through their line, boys, we're fighting 

now 
With might and main, 

It is Waltham's day, and you're here to play 
Bring the victory home again. 
Throw back ev'ry play they made, boys, 
Just hold 'em and ne'er say die; 
We're back of you now and ever 
Shouting our Battle cry, Hi-yi! 
REFRAIN 



HMAKl<E»l OBE*-('<EL»l-<S=»( •£»-( <3=JC-l -X»< --"3X-1 4t»l -ft=E-l <^»" 



Class of 1942 ™ >•* 



THE COMMERCIAL CLUB 



The Commercial Club of the Class of 1942 
started its activities for the year with the election 
of officers. 

The Club's first meeting was held in the As- 
sembly Hall with a membershop of 100 attend- 
ing. Mr. Slayton, our Superintendent and guest 
of our meeting, delivered a short talk to an in- 
terested audience. Entertainment was furnished 
by various talented members of the Club. 

The second meeting was in the form of motion 
pictures presented by the Boston Elevated Rail 
way Company. I'm sure all who attended appre- 
ciated the fine pictures. 

With the spirit of Christmas in the air, the 
members assembled for their third meeting. A 
varied program of entertainment was highlighted 
by the appearance of such stars as Audrey Kilgore, 
Naomi Haag, Virginia Cullen and many others. 
At the conclusion of the program the members 
filed down to the Cafeteria to enjoy the refresh- 
ments prepared by the Social Committee under the 



Chairmanship of Muriel Geisler. "Bud" Mall-.n 
gave a great performance as Saint Nick. 

A March meeting was another feature of the 
activities of the Commercial Club. Two motio l 
pictures with the titles "Oil for Aladdin's Lamp" 
and "Pipeline" were the subject of the meeting. 

The fourth assembly was held for the purpose 
of imparting to the students helpful hints in con- 
nection with entering the business world. The 
close of the year seemed to come fast, and the 
Commercial Club held its final meeting on Proj- 
pect Hill. Weenies and pop seemed to please a 
hungry crowd who enjoyed their last meeting as 
the Commercial Club of the Class of 1942. 

Due to the fact that many of the Senior students 
were placed in afternoon positions, they were un- 
able to attend the meetings. 

On behalf of the members of the Commercial 
Club, I wish to express many thanks to Mr. 
George Lees for his co-operation and patience in 
preparing all our meetings. 

Russell Carlson, President, '42. 



THE RADIO GUILD 



The newest of the extra-curricular activities in 
our school is the Radio Guild. This group was 
formally admitted to the circle of Waltham High 
Clubs shortly after the mid-year vacation, when 
Mr. Lionel Mosher, was approached by a small 
group and asked to be the sponsor of the club. 
The object of the Guild is to enable its members 
to obtain practice in speaking over a microphone, 
and (If they are interested in radio as a profes- 
sion) to provide a common meeting ground where 
the different phases of radio and the problems 
connected with them can be discussed. 

The Radio Guild is unique in that it has no 
duly elected body of officers. In their place are 
various departments modeled after those which are 
ordinarily found in a radio station. For example, 
there is a script department, a technical depart 
ment, and a music department. There is also a 
music supervisor and a program director. The 
best feature of this system is its elasticity. In it 
a guild member is allowed to associate himself 
with any or all of the various departments. 

The technical department is one of the most 
interesting in the club. At present, plans are be- 
ing drawn up for a small transmitter which will 



permit broadcasting to any room in the building. 
A sub-committee is also studying the arrangement 
with which different colleges have been broad- 
casting. This system, which utilizes the radiator 
system as a "sending" wire, does not require a:i 
F. C C. license. 

In order that club members may hear their 
voices and recognize their speech errors, a great 
number of records have been cut. These records 
have aided greatly in the improvement of diction. 

The Radio Guild offers, also, a very practic.il 
service to the school. It has been the custom, be- 
fore any school event, for the committee in charge 
of that event to put on a short program in the 
various assemblies. This has taken a great deal 
of time which most committees could ill afford 
to spare. The Radio Guild, however, can adver- 
tise any event which a committee is to hold. The 
script department writes the script and all other 
arrangements are made by the various depart- 
ments. The great variety of talent which is avail- 
able makes it possible to put on any type of 
program. 

The Radio Guild, new though it is, has already 
proved its worth, both to the individual and !o 
the school. 

Joseph F. Hill, Jr., '42. 



— * — Class of 1942- 



DRAMATIC CLUB 



The Waltham High School Dramatic Club has 
had one of its most successful years with 102 
members enrolled. 

The meetings included a variety of programs 
such as a quiz, sketches, Mr. Roach as a guest 
speaker, plays, and movies. 

Many of the members acted in the 3 one-act 
plays which were given in January. The plays 
were Hurricane Hill, Of All Things, and Johnny 
Goes Haywire. They were coached by Mr. Roach, 
Miss Mehring, and Miss Virginia Estabrook. 

Miss Virginia Estabrook is the Club advisor. 

Club members who deserve special mention for 
their interest and activity are Dorothy Sharp, Jean 



O'Neil, Marie Dion, Charles Lane, Donald Pierce 
Jeanette True, Adele Bettinson, Willard Calkins, 
Caryl Glynes, Barbara Champion, Robert Erickson, 
Roger Morris, Nancy Calkins, Harold Killiam, 
Jean Leishman, Jane Turner, Constance Elorett,, 
Freeman Murphy, Joan Turner, Austin Starr, 
Francis Dougherty, Phyllis Erickson, Jeanne Web- 
ster, and Melvin Hayden. 

The officers for this year were: 

President : Jean O'Neil 

Vice President Robert Erickson 

Secretary Adele Bettinson 

Treasurer Nancy Calkins 







Don't eat her food and hang around, 
And then leave nonchalantly; 
Just stop a bit to give your thanks, 
That's doing it gallantly! 





Each time you keep her out late 
SHE takes the rap, not you; 
So be a wise old nightowl, 
And bide by Dad's curfew. 




No fair yelling 'cross the way 

To catch ol' Susie's ear; 

The well-bred boys will cut 

noise 
And wait 'til Susie's near. 



the 




If you'd impress her mother 
That you're to the manner born, 
Come up and knock each time you 

call, 
And don't lean on that horn! 



r 



******* 




^****** 



AN AMERICAN TRADITION 



WALTHAM 



«or. 






(/we 




ewb 



to ^Ladveb wrbd ^yewjw&m- 



€M, 



^/tnce 48M9 



» 



**************** 



)^»<)«»ii'^l)«»l)4B'0'«»l)-^()«»()^»I)«»()«»()«^n4»[i-«vi-4^'i«M». 1 i-«»o-^<M 






Northeastern University 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers for young men a broad program of college 
subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and 
technical achievement. Students may concentrate 
in any of the following fields: Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Mathematics, 
Physics, and English (including an option in 
Journalism). Pre-Medical, Pre-Dental and Pre- 
Legal courses are offered. Varied opportunities 
available for vocational specialization. Degree: 
Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts. 



College of Engineering 

Offers for young men curricula in Civil, Mechan- 
ical (with Air-Conditioning, and Aeronautical op- 
tions), Electrical, Chemical, and Industrial 
Engineering. Classroom study is supplemented by 
experiment and research in well-equipped labora- 
tories. Degree: Bachelor of Science in the pro- 
fessional field of specialization. 



College of Business Administration 

Offers for young men the following four curricula: Accounting, Marketing and 
Advertising, and Industrial Administration. Each curriculum provides a sound 
training in the fundamentals of business practice and culminates in special courses 
devoted to the various professional fields. Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration. 



School of Law 

Bachelor of Laws. A minimum of one-half of the 
work accepted for a bachelor's degree in an ap- 
proved college or its full equivalent required for 
admission to undergraduate programs. Case 
method of instruction. 

The School also offers a two-year evening pro- 
gram open to graduates of approved law schools 
and leading to the degree of Master of Laws. 

Undergraduate and graduate programs admit men 
and women. 



School of Business 

Offers curricula through evening classes in Ac- 
counting, Industrial Management, Distributive 
Management, and Engineering and Business, lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Business Ad- 
ministration in specified fields. Preparation for 
C. P. A. Examinations. A special four-year curri- 
culum in Law and Business Management leading 
to the Bachelor of Commercial Science degree with 
appropriate specification is also offered. Shorter 
programs may be arranged. Co-educational. 



Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during evening hours 
affording concentration in Economics, English, History and Government or Social 
Science. A special program preparing for admission to the School of Law is also 
available. The program is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirement for the 
A.B. or S.B. degree. Associate in Arts title conferred. Co-educatoinal. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering and Business Administration offer day programs for men only, 
and are conducted on the co-operative plan. After the freshman year students may alternate their pe- 
riods of study with periods of work in the employ of business or industrial concerns at ten-week inter- 
vals. Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large part of their college expenses. 



1 FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE ; 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY , 

' Director of Admissions . 
I Boston, Massachusetts 

I Please send me a catalog of the □ Evening — College of Liberal Arts ' 

□ College of Liberal Arts □ Day Pre-Medical Program | 

□ College of Engineering □ Day Pre-Dental Program . 

| □ College of Business Administration U Day and Evening Pre-Legal Programs ' 

ID School of Law ( 

□ Evening School of Business ■ 

| Name ' 

I Address - ! 

I I 

| C-52 I 



^)«»<j«»<>^()4 









►'*"♦ 

! 



Tel. WALtham 2313 



ELM SPRING FARM j Waltham Pharmacy, Inc. 



GRADE "A" MILK 



AND CREAM 



757 MOODY STREET 



390 MAIN STREET 






( WALTHAM 

i 

j Phone Wal. 4784-2326 

i 
i 






►«)-^«'-«»'>«»'"'^'"^""a»ii«»-i A 



\ 



For Prompt Delivery | 

i 

i 



GUTHRIE LUMBER 



ABEL MELANSON \ 

! 
j 

11 CHURCH STREET ! 



COMPANY 



WALTHAM 



Expert Tailoring 



j Ladles' Suits made to Order ! 



167 Lexington Street 



"Friendly Service" 



Waltham, Mass. 



Phone WALtham 4808 






NEWTON 



SECRETARIAL 
SCHOOL 



Summer Division 

July 6 to August 14 



Beginning Shorthand 

Beginning Typewriting 
Transcription 



Day Division 



September 14, 1942, to June 25, 1943 

Intensive Secretarial Course 
Stenographic Course 

Clerical Course 

Special Course For College Graduates 



Evening Division 



September 28, 1942, to May 28, 1943 

Beginning Shorthand and Beginning Typewriting 

Advanced Shorthand and Advanced Typewriting 
Transcription 

Business English and Office Correspondence 

Qualify for Certificates of Proficiency 

Typewriting Certificate Secretarial Certificate 

Transcription Certificate Stenographic Certificate 

Any One Of These Certificates Entitles You To Placement Service 

OUR PLACEMENT RECORD IS EXCELLENT ! ! ! 

Lenrn More About Our School in a Personal Interview 
ASK FOR BULLETIN 
392 Centre Street BIGelow 5711 

Newton LASell 4303 



I 




WATCH CITY TAXI SERVICE 

Cadillacs for all Occasions 

TAXI 

CALL WALTHAM 5000 

24 Hour 673 MAIN STREET 

Service (Cor. Common St.) 



I 



Harry A. Starr Fuel Co. 

| "Serve You Right" 



Compliments of 



i 



Genuine New England Coke 



W.H. NICHOLS & SONS 



420 MOODY STREET 



Tel. Wal. 0884 



i 



i 

| Fuel To Meet All Requirements 












»<><=Z>(>«Z>C)'«1»<>«^0-«E< ._>o-«.»o »i»-«o<»-i]«ri<.T.-OL?>ih >i ^»o^M;i»,,« t .i l «»() 1 »o«,o-f»r l «»ii«»-o-«»-i'«»-i>'«»'>«»''-«»'''-^"-^'»'^«'^V 



WALTHAM SECRETARIAL 
SCHOOL 



One-Year Intensive Secretarial Course 



Special Courses Arranged 



DAY AND EVENING SESSIONS 



R. H. GALLAGHER 



740 Main Street 



Wal. 3744-R 






i 



i BRENTON E. TYLER i 



COMPLIMENTS 
OP 



REAL ESTATE 



INSURANCE 



ANNE'S BEAUTY 



688 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



PARLOR 



- < . -^w- ' i-^mm-mmi-o i m ■(>-*— -"-» 



► u«*n«»n«»ii»n«»iM 



>'0«»()«»l)^l)'iB'()«n>'l)^l)«»O4 



»d«h»o^^o^^o^^o«»o«»o^^o«»(1 



The 

American Superior 
Shoe Rebuilding Co. 

Ed. J. Provencher, Prop. 

True To Its Name 
Reliable To The Minute 



705 MOODY STREET 
Waltham, Mass. 






■ >«tt msz> >«r» >-crr? >-cnr >*-n >«=■ w 



I Waltham 

i 

! Wall Paper 8C Paint Co. 

j- Established 1905 

i 
i 

I 591-593 MAIN STREET 

! 

i Waltham, Mass. 

j 

j Waltham 3732 

i 

! L. Goldberg 

i 



* V 



READ & WHITE 

MEN'S and 
WOMEN'S 

FORMAL 
CLOTHES 
"TlllM RENTED 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

QUALITY ALWAYS' 

111 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
W00LW0RTH BLOC, PROVIDENCE, H. I. 





COMPLIMENTS OF 



EMBASSY THEATRE 



WILLIAM HARTNETT, Manager 



Matinees at 2 o'clock 



Evenings at 8 o'clock 



i 



*••••••••*•••••••••••••••••••• 



• 

• 

• 
• 
• 



What can J? 
do to help? 




* Thumb-twiddling is out, but definitely! And you can sock-knit and U.S.O. in * 
your spare time. But if you are really keen to help keep things rolling . . . 
prepare yourself for a job. That's truly stars-and-stripes! 

Uncle Sam and the Busy B's (Big Business) will need trained minds and 
hands for quite a while to come. And smart girls, "making haste slowly," are 
taking time to obtain the best business training they can find. 

Many 1942 graduates are choosing Fisher School for their career-preparation. 
This thorough secretarial training, built around individual abilities and inter- 
ests, gives you what it takes to get and hold a permanent, well-paid position. 
One-Year Intensive and Two-Year Comprehensive courses emphasize back- 
ground-building as well as mastery of technical skills. More than 1500 calls 
for Fisher graduates last year! Call or write for catalog. 

Two convenient locations: BOSTON, 118 Beacon St.; SOMERVILLE, 374 Broadway 



THE 



FISHER 



SCHOOLS 



• 

• 
• 
• 

• 

• 



• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••■A-* 



Have More 



^e «*SS2 *5 



WITH SYSTEMATIC SAVING 



HOW SAVINGS HELP 

To "Have More", can mean to have more money. That's 
exactly the way systematic savings help you have more 
. . . they increase your cash in TWO ways. 

Dividends are added to your account every three 
months. So your savings make money for you as long as 
they stay in the bank. When you need them, in order to 
buy for cash something which might cost you more if you 
bought it on credit, they're ready to help you have more 
in the second way. By permitting cash buying which 
might not otherwise be possible, your savings make 
money for you when you withdraw them from the bank. 

Find out for yourself, how systematic savings can help 
you have more in TWO ways ... by opening an account 
at this institution this month. You'll find a welcome here. 



Systematic saving is both fast and 
easy. It's fast because the regular 
savings-payments you make each 
month and the dividends we pay 
you every quarter help your savings 
grow larger every month in the 
year. It's easy because each single 
monthly payment is small, and 
easy-to-make. 

WMmmm 

CO-OPERATIVE 

B A|J|# MffY-ONl yiaii or ii.vici 

W#*I^ IV 56 Main St., Wot.rtown, Man. 



* t icTO()<='n«sti-<>-«H*K)-«0fc-(>4ll*'t)'*d-<)-«^tH 






K;<E7>()<irM :< 



('<23H %>04^D-04 



THOMAS P. HOLLAND CO. 

MEN'S WEAR 
TUXED03 FOR RENT 



95 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



C-<s<ZX>-M<H3M>.37r--<>- 









PHONE FOR FOOD 



KARDON BROS. 



43 Bedford Street 



Tel. WALtham 40«5 



Learn 
Beauty Culture 

at 
WILFRED 
ACADEMY 

We train you 
in a short time 

at low cosi 

Ideal positions, good 

pay and advancement 

await you in either 

war or peace time. 

There is a shortage of 
experienced operators. 

Write for 1942 Catalog H 
Day & Evening Classes begin each week. Visit our 
classes in session and see our employment records. 

WILFRED ACADEMY 

492 Boylston St. Boston, Mass. Ken. 0880 



n -«■»-".«»»- <>-«<■». . .-CW- < >-W»-<>-^Wn«SHH >-«W>< >•«»-<<• -OM»- <• 4i» <>-«»-(> -M» ll«»l ) «»li.^i.^^ii^». l j«M-i>-««'(>-«»''>«»ii'IB-P-III»i>-Sn-n4B»< ' [)«.-«-. "«*»■< -C»< >-3S>< «3 w-OBn )<x»-i >-«»r ■■*! I 



Compliments 
of 



GEORGE L. CHAPIN DAIRY 



■ »»4^<)«»0^0^<}4^l)^()^()«»0«»()4^()«»(>^()«»()^0«»<)^^()^()«»()^()^()«»()^0«»!)4i»l)^{)«»M 






*>U'«»0-^Hft-C>-«:.X-<?-<Z»-c:<CT», 



) j 

! ^„ MIDDLESEX ^ I 

j UNIVERSITY | 

| COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, A.B. and B.S. degrees j 

j SCHOOL OF MEDICINE, M.D. degree f 

j SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE, D.V.M. degree 

• Qualified high school graduates may enter the College on July 1st 
I or on September 24th. Accelerated wartime program of preprofessional 

(study prepares candidates Tor admission to the Veterinary School in 
» 1__- .1.. __.J f_„ _ T> C __ A T> J J _J • _• _ *_ ,1.. 



twelve months, and for a B.S. or A.B. degree and admission to the 
Medical School in 36 months. 

• Middlesex University participates in the federal student work pro- 
| gram of the National Youth Administration. Coeducational. Modern, 

jj newly erected buildings. 100-acre campus. Comfortable new dormitories. 

Well-equipped laboratories. Faculty of specialists for each school. 

CATALOG WILL BE SENT ON REQUEST 
MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY • WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



I 



j 



i 



I 

( COMPLIMENTS 



i 

i 

i 
i 
i 

c 

I 

i 
i 



i 

of ! 

I 
i 
i 



NEW ENGLAND i 

1 

! MICA COMPANY ! 



JOSEPH O'NEIL 

OPTOMETRIST 

Examination by Appointment 

Flynn Building, 657 Main St., Waltham 
Office Hours - 8:30 A. M. to 5:P. M. 

Wednesdays and Fridays, 7 to 8:30 P. M. 



BEN'S 
AUTO PARTS CO. 



AT YOUR SERVICE 



ADRIAN SMITH 



Used Cars 
and Parts 



Custom Cleanser 



' Reversible Coats a Specialty 



i 



91 Felton Street 
Waltham 



833A MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



Tel. Waltham 4529 



i- 



i 




SPECIAL SCHOOL OFFER 

12 cabinet photographs and one 8x10 $5.00 

25 cabinet photographs and one 8x10 $9.00 

50 cabinet photographs and one 8x10 framed 

in beautiful easel frame $13.00 

A generous selection of proofs to choose from. 
Glossy print with every order. 

DAVID PHIPPS — Photographer 



37 South Street 



Tel. Waltham 3431-W 



* 



MOLLICA 
MOTOR SALES 



WALTHAM'S OLDEST DEALER \ 

Established 1918 \ 

\ 

i 

c 

I 

DE SOTO & PLYMOUTH CARS j 

703 Main St., Waltham, Mass. 
Tel. Waltham 1643 



ANDERSON 
Florist 

Corsage Specialist 



196 MOODY ST. 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

TeL Wal. 1843 






H. L. STONE DAIRY 

Est. 1872 

MILK • CREAM 




Compliments of 



Waltham Coal Co. 



Established 1872 



Sealed in Cellophane For Your 
Protection 



»n.^n«r'^^<>~ 









>'K=r>ri*e=>(H 



><l*=3Ml-fcZ>:>.OE».'>.«><Mr 






Bowling 

Jewelry 

For 

Prizes 



SENff*FOR PrN WTR0PHY CATALOG 







NEW ALL COMPANY 

Rugs, and Carpets, Wallpaper, 

Linoleum, Paints, Venetian 

Blinds, Window Shades 

107 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 

Tel. WALtham 1824 



Compliments 
OP 



MENDELSOHNS 



409 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



»-"~«^|>^»n«»o^^<>«i»<Mafr(>4a»(>^H»o^HM>-^»ii-a 



»(>'^»-o-aa»(H 



•■< >-mmt >^h»o-«^»o« 



<*»>-«»<>^»o-^»-n-« 



»|i«»i «»i>4 






^["d»o-«»<<c>i — >0«M)4 



Bryant & Stratton 

An up-to-date school with 77 years of experience 
in training and placing young men and women in 
Business Administration and Secretarial positions 

Ask for Day, Evening or Summer catalog 

334 Boylston St., Boston -Kenniore 6789 



» o-^^-n-MB>o-*W-<><^»< )•«»(>•«•-{ >-^H»<(>-« 



»-(>-^»0-W»C)4 



1 




PERMANENTS 

$2.95 - $4.00 - $5.00 



YOUTH VICTORIOUS! 

These beauty services, all enemies of 

straight or snarly hair - are waiting for 

you atPerna's Beauty Salon, at the 

fingertips of Mary Perna our beauty 

expert. Will you pass them by and 

lose the proud approval of your boy 

friends, the admiration of your family 

and friends? Or will you take advantage 

of them and emerge triumphant, radiant 

with youth - surrounded by happiness? 



Tel. Waltham 4513 



834 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM 



IDEAL CONCRETE BLOCK CO. 



MASON'S SUPPLIES 



232 Lexington Street 



2S»< '"■:»■( -f3K>^i < 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



RED CROSS 



WALtham 3206 



SPENCER 



SHOE STORE 



Moody and Spruce Streets 



PHARMACY 



Waltham 



l . 



Where the Customer is Right Sometimes 



PAUL'S LUNCH, INC. 



Paul A. Mulcahy 



641 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



Telephone WALtham 4555 






•>0<^»0<«»()-^»04^»-0^»0-«»<><« 






-04a»-< >-<■». o-oav-u . 



».< l -n»-i')-i»<i«»ii' 



*>«*? 



Tel. Wal. 2680 

HERBERT T. SPENCER 

INTERIOR FURNISHINGS 
CUSTOM MADE SHADES 

Draperies, Floor Covering, Awnings, Screens 
708 MAIN ST. WALTHAM, MASS. 



j «^^m^OHi-^»-i 



.■■•» l i.^!iC^ >■€=> )■« 



> i )«» (HiM>-ij-«m3-i>-«E».ii-wra-r >■«■»-< >-*«><p-<M»i>.*M».<ni 






Large or Small 
Short or Tall 
If it's Pants you want 
We can fit you all. 
Remember Our Slogan 
Don't Pant Around we have Them 

$1.50 to $5.00 



DO YOU KNOW THAT 



JACK LEARY 



S A MEAT MARKET AT 



| S. & J. PANT SHOP | 

j 214 MOODY STREET | 

{ Near Embassy Theatre f 






i 



53 PROSPECT STREET 



Call WALtliam 1985-M 



t-n4B'll«»il- 



Ml«»il*»<]«»"' 



M)«»()«»l)«»()^l)«»()i»<)«»l)4 



BEST WISHES FROM 

"Bill Mitchell" 

"Your Friendly Chevrolet Dealer" 

WEST END CHEVROLET, INC. 



866 MAIN STREET 



WALtham 0083 



•■ti'^m-ti^m-it^m-tt'^m-it'^mty^m'ti-mm-o-^m-o-^m-o-mm-o-m 



Compliments of 

WALTHAM FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

Where you can save any amount 
at any time 



7 1 6 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



RICHARD H. BIRD 



MOODY 8C REGAN 
Printers 




Tel. Wal. 1111 

621 Main Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



♦;♦>• 






► <)«•■<..••• n <=*».■ ..C3., <n»M ***.,, -an. <>*■», ,-«*., y— j. o«e»' >-«*-' -wm-o -«*»>> «v»-<,-<^ <> -m»'>-< 



SMARTS OIL CO. 



Essoheat Fuel Oils 



811 Main Street 



Waltham 3000 






CURTIS & CROSTON 
INC. 

PACKING — MOVING — SHIPPING 

83 Charles Street 
Boston 



Telephones 
ILAF. 1033 WAX. 2616 



DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, RADIOS 

Waltham, Hamilton, Gruen Watches 

Cash or Budget Terms 



H. E. Weston Jewelry Co. | 

353 Moody Street j 

Waltham, Mass. 

The Upstairs Store that Saves You Money 




SHE. KNOWS THAT) 
'CUT PRtCfe OTT'J 
IS BLUFF 





IT PAYS TO 
TRADE AT 
WARREN'S 



RUFUS WARREN & SON 

39 Moody Street Waltham 







t.:,^mmf-<>-^mm-<>-m^<'>'mim-<,-mm-<\-tmm->>-in»-<>-mtm-i>-<mm-o^mm'i-'mm-'>-mm:> ,-«»-. >-*^.< net >«b-u-«»i>«»i>«»<ii 



»<i«»o-«»i<«»'i'^ii«rMi'r- Mj<r>-o-^ii«»ii-a»<)«»^% 



BALTIMORE CLEANERS, INC. 



--*=»< .-«F».n* 



760 MAIN STREET 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

We Call and Deliver 

Telephone WALtham 2300 



*" w ""T""— "•—'"— ° '""■" •>—"•« <>— <<>_„«,—„ '— ■<-! 



A. HOLICKER & CO. 



Compliments of 



Exclusive Agents for 
FARM BUREAU BAGS 



rW 



WESLEY'S 



Rear 107 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



BEAUTYLAND 



RUTH, EMILY AND WESLEY 



I — 



- — ~»<._ — — o— — o» — — o»..».i — o — « — ■> — o — o — t »o^owM,^,««n »«<>«<■ »£**■■» o — ■ j 



INVEST IN 
VICTORY 




► «'«»-"-«»-"-«»"-^'i«»-i.^^i- 



KH^»-i.«*— .c.-^.i^^.n^H^ 



H 1 -^ l ,«»il-«^.)-I^O<»."-«»-M.^ni»<|.«»i..».|..^|.-»»l*-«»lM*-o.«^..-^o-« 



AUTOGRAPHS 



AUTOGRAPHS 



c 



■ 






■ 









w 









M 



■■ 



■ 

« ST 
I 

■ 



< 






^B 









ARCHIVES